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Emotional Intelligence: A Hidden Key to Career and Workplace Success

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When the term “intelligence” comes up in regular conversation, most of us associate it with a person’s capacity to acquire knowledge and new skills.

This type of intelligence can be measured with IQ, which helps us determine if the test taker is closer to a Stephen Hawking or a Lloyd Christmas on the smarts scale. And certainly, given no other data, a hiring manager would likely prefer to choose someone on the Hawking end of the spectrum.

But while IQ is useful, it’s also clear that emotional intelligence (EQ) can be a difference maker in any professional role.

Defining Emotional Intelligence

Have you ever met an entrepreneur with so much empathy and awareness, that they can read people in every situation and relate? Or a salesperson that will always genuinely put your success ahead of their own personal gain?

These are powerful qualities – and emotional intelligence is all about the ability to better navigate social situations, including with colleagues, bosses, and clients.

Today’s infographic comes from Aumann Bender & Associates, and it defines emotional intelligence while explaining the benefits of higher EQ in both qualitative and quantitative terms.

Emotional Intelligence: A Hidden Key to Career and Workplace Success

Even if someone is smart in terms of IQ, it doesn’t necessarily translate to career success.

In fact, emotional intelligence explains why 70% of the time, a person with an average IQ can actually outperform a person with more smarts.

Quantifying EQ

Although the topic of emotional intelligence may seem “touchy-feely” for some, the benefits of having a higher EQ are cold, hard facts to ponder:

  • A whopping 90% of top performers have high EQs
  • Emotional intelligence explains 58% of a leader’s job performance
  • People with higher EQs make an average of $29,000 more per year than people with lower EQs
  • Every one-point increase in EQ equates roughly to $1,300 in annual salary
  • Research shows that EQ is crucial across all industries and sectors

So the next time you’re looking at how to get an edge at the workplace, consider that it’s not just knowledge or skills that you should be after.

Sometimes there is a higher ROI in the “soft skills”: being more self-aware, learning how to effectively express your opinions or emotions, finding ways to bounce back from adversity, or managing stress or negative emotions can be more important than technical skills in improving career performance.

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Misc

Charted: The Number of Democracies Globally

How many democracies does the world have? This visual shows the change since 1945 and the top nations becoming more (and less) democratic.

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Charted: The Number of Democracies Globally

The end of World War II in 1945 was a turning point for democracies around the world.

Before this critical turning point in geopolitics, democracies made up only a small number of the world’s countries, both legally and in practice. However, over the course of the next six decades, the number of democratic nations would more than quadruple.

Interestingly, studies have found that this trend has recently reversed as of the 2010s, with democracies and non-democracies now in a deadlock.

In this visualization, Staffan Landin uses data from V-DEM’s Electoral Democratic Index (EDI) to highlight the changing face of global politics over the past two decades and the nations that contributed the most to this change.

The Methodology

V-DEM’s EDI attempts to measure democratic development in a comprehensive way, through the contributions of 3,700 experts from countries around the world.

Instead of relying on each nation’s legally recognized system of government, the EDI analyzes the level of electoral democracy in countries on a range of indicators, including:

  • Free and fair elections
  • Rule of law
  • Alternative sources of information and association
  • Freedom of expression

Countries are assigned a score on a scale from 0 to 1, with higher scores indicating a higher level of democracy. Each is also categorized into four types of functional government, from liberal and electoral democracies to electoral and closed autocracies.

Which Countries Have Declined the Most?

The EDI found that numerous countries around the world saw declines in democracy over the past two decades. Here are the 10 countries that saw the steepest decline in EDI score since 2010:

CountryDemocracy Index (2010)Democracy Index (2022)Points Lost
🇭🇺 Hungary0.800.46-34
🇵🇱 Poland0.890.59-30
🇷🇸 Serbia0.610.34-27
🇹🇷 Türkiye0.550.28-27
🇮🇳 India0.710.44-27
🇲🇱 Mali0.510.25-26
🇹🇭 Thailand0.440.20-24
🇦🇫 Afghanistan0.380.16-22
🇧🇷 Brazil0.880.66-22
🇧🇯 Benin0.640.42-22

Central and Eastern Europe was home to three of the countries seeing the largest declines in democracy. Hungary, Poland, and Serbia lead the table, with Hungary and Serbia in particular dropping below scores of 0.5.

Some of the world’s largest countries by population also decreased significantly, including India and Brazil. Across most of the top 10, the “freedom of expression” indicator was hit particularly hard, with notable increases in media censorship to be found in Afghanistan and Brazil.

Countries Becoming More Democratic

Here are the 10 countries that saw the largest increase in EDI score since 2010:

CountryDemocracy Index (2010)Democracy Index (2022)Points Gained
🇦🇲 Armenia0.340.74+40
🇫🇯 Fiji0.140.40+26
🇬🇲 The Gambia0.250.50+25
🇸🇨 Seychelles0.450.67+22
🇲🇬 Madagascar0.280.48+20
🇹🇳 Tunisia0.400.56+16
🇱🇰 Sri Lanka0.420.57+15
🇬🇼 Guinea-Bissau0.410.56+15
🇲🇩 Moldova0.590.74+15
🇳🇵 Nepal0.460.59+13

Armenia, Fiji, and Seychelles saw significant improvement in the autonomy of their electoral management bodies in the last 10 years. Partially as a result, both Armenia and Seychelles have seen their scores rise above 0.5.

The Gambia also saw great improvement across many election indicators, including the quality of voter registries, vote buying, and election violence. It was one of five African countries to make the top 10 most improved democracies.

With the total number of democracies and non-democracies almost tied over the past four years, it is hard to predict the political atmosphere in the future.

Want to know more about democracy in today’s world? Check out our global breakdown of each country’s democratic score in Mapped: The State of Global Democracy in 2022.
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