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Why Your Customers Are Leaving – and How To Win Them Back

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The Chart of the Week is a weekly Visual Capitalist feature on Fridays.

One of the most important questions facing a business of any size is: why do your customers leave?

It doesn’t matter if you are a part of a Fortune 500 firm, or if you are a local plumber that works out of a van. This question should be important to you, because it has a huge impact on your livelihood.

Oddly enough, it turns out the answer to the question could be deceivingly simple. Businesses just don’t seem to care enough about their customers.

Why Customers Leave

Even if your product is mediocre. Even if you are technologically behind your competitors. Even if your prices are higher – if you actually care about your customers, you will still have a chance at keeping them on board.

That’s because people want to work with companies that have “skin in the game” with their clients. They want you to fight for them, and to be noticeably invested in their success.

Yes, you still have to deliver on your promises, but just showing your ongoing commitment to their problems will go a long way.

Here’s the Disconnect

If you are thinking that the above fact is obvious, then you are not alone.

There are thousands of companies across the world that have deemed customer service to be their big competitive advantage. They have company rallies where they talk about putting the customer first, and their internal messaging is all around how being “customer-centric” is the engine behind the company’s success.

The problem (and the opportunity) is that although everyone says they are focused on solving the problems of their customers, nobody actually executes on this promise successfully.

Consulting firm Bain & Company calls this the “Delivery Gap”:

The Customer Delivery Gap

It’s like a New Year’s Resolution. Almost everybody makes them, but no one actually keeps them.

But it’s a huge opportunity. If everyone says that they are customer-centric but only very few actually deliver, that means that clients are rightly skeptical about such a claim. It’s your opportunity to turn their outlook upside-down by unexpectedly hopping right into the trenches with them.

Once they see you fighting for them on a personal basis, it will make a world of difference.

The Proof is in the Pudding

These types of customer relationships translate to real success, even in the stock market:

ACSI Long/Short Portfolio

This is the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) long/short portfolio. Basically it represents the idea of buying equity in companies that have high levels of customer satisfaction, while betting against the companies that customers hate.

The end result? Consistent outperformance against the S&P 500 over the last 16 years.

Real customer service translates to real wins, and it will likely allow you to decrease client turnover, while upping the lifetime value of each customer.

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Mapped: The World’s Least Affordable Housing Markets in 2024

See which housing markets are considered ‘impossibly unaffordable’ according to their median price-to-income ratio.

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The World’s Least Affordable Housing Markets in 2024

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Many cities around the world have become very expensive to buy a home in, but which ones are the absolute most unattainable?

In this graphic, we highlight a number of housing markets that are deemed to be “impossibly unaffordable” in 2024, ranked by their median price-to-income ratio.

This data comes from the Demographia International Housing Affordability Report, which is produced by the Chapman University Center for Demographics and Policy.

Data and Key Takeaway

The median price-to-income ratio compares median house price to median household income within each market. A higher ratio (higher prices relative to incomes) means a city is less affordable.

See the following table for all of the data we used to create this graphic. Note that this analysis covers 94 markets across eight countries: Australia, Canada, China, Ireland, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

RankMetropolitan MarketCountryMedian price-to-income
ratio
1Hong Kong (SAR)🇨🇳 China16.7
2Sydney🇦🇺 Australia13.8
3Vancouver🇨🇦 Canada12.3
4San Jose🇺🇸 U.S.11.9
5Los Angeles🇺🇸 U.S.10.9
6Honolulu🇺🇸 U.S.10.5
7Melbourne🇦🇺 Australia9.8
8San Francisco🇺🇸 U.S.9.7
9Adelaide🇦🇺 Australia9.7
10San Diego🇺🇸 U.S.9.5
11Toronto🇨🇦 Canada9.3
12Auckland🇳🇿 New Zealand8.2

According to the Demographia report, cities with a median price-to-income ratio of over 9.0 are considered “impossibly unaffordable”.

We can see that the top city in this ranking, Hong Kong, has a ratio of 16.7. This means that the median price of a home is 16.7 times greater than the median income.

Which Cities are More Affordable?

On the flipside, here are the top 12 most affordable cities that were analyzed in the Demographia report.

RankMetropolitan MarketCountryMedian price-to-income
ratio
1Pittsburgh🇺🇸 U.S.3.1
2Rochester🇺🇸 U.S.3.4
2St. Louis🇺🇸 U.S.3.4
4Cleveland🇺🇸 U.S.3.5
5Edmonton🇨🇦 Canada3.6
5Buffalo🇺🇸 U.S.3.6
5Detroit🇺🇸 U.S.3.6
5Oklahoma City🇺🇸 U.S.3.6
9Cincinnati🇺🇸 U.S.3.7
9Louisville🇺🇸 U.S.3.7
11Singapore🇸🇬 Singapore3.8
12Blackpool & Lancashire🇬🇧 U.K.3.9

Cities with a median price-to-income ratio of less than 3.0 are considered “affordable”, while those between 3.1 and 4.0 are considered “moderately unaffordable”.

See More Real Estate Content From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoyed this post, be sure to check out Ranked: The Most Valuable Housing Markets in America.

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