Which Cities are Fueling America's Craft Beer Boom?
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Which Cities are Fueling America’s Craft Beer Boom?

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The craft beer industry in the United States has been a bright spot of the economy for nearly a decade.

With an economic impact of $23.5 billion and the number of operating breweries in the U.S. totaling well over 5,000 today, the industry is clearly past the point of being a millennial fad. There are more choices available than ever before, and this appears to signal a broader shift in consumer preference.

Below is a look at both historical and recent craft beer industry numbers:

craft brewery statistics

Mapping Craft Beer Hubs

The craft beer boom is a nation-wide trend, but there are certain cities that have an outsize influence on the industry both in volume and reputation. Recently, The Pudding’s Russell Goldenberg looked to answer the question: which city is the microbrew capital of the U.S.?

Goldenberg looks at both quality of beer (based on user ratings), as well as the quantity of nearby breweries as criteria. Below are the Top 10 cities based on equal weights for both categories, with an end result that may be unexpected for some.

Top Breweries in the United States

Extremely high user ratings helped power mid-sized cities like Santa Rosa and Anchorage up the rankings. The offerings in these places, such as Russian River Brewing and Midnight Sun Brewing Company, are among the top rated brewers in the country, setting a high bar for quality.

However, in terms of the pure quantity of breweries, cities like Denver, Portland, and San Diego can’t be beat. The Denver “Beer Triangle” has over 72 breweries alone, while Portland is a regular destination for beer lovers from all over the continent.

New Breweries Per Capita

Looking at the state level, per capita data paints an interesting picture of where craft beer hot spots are beginning to emerge:

breweries state per capita
Browse the full list here.

Most notably, Vermont is wild about craft beer, though their industry is more uniformly spread throughout the state (as opposed to clustered in a single city). A recent count shows 68 active breweries in a state with just 625,000 in population – a very impressive beer-to-drinker ratio.

Bubble Brewing?

Will the craft beer boom continue, or is there already too much froth in some cities?

Currently, 75% of Americans live within 10 miles of a brewery, but there are still plenty of population centers that could support a local brewery. Savvy marketing, unique offerings, and millennial preferences for local products may continue to push the craft brew trend into new parts of the country, so this will be an interesting list to revisit in a few years.

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Automotive

The Most Fuel Efficient Cars From 1975 to Today

This infographic lists the most fuel efficient cars over the past 46 years, including the current leader for 2023.

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The Most Fuel Efficient Cars From 1975 to Today

When shopping for a new car, what is the most important factor you look for? According to Statista, it’s not design, quality, or even safety—it’s fuel efficiency.

Because of this, automakers are always looking for clever ways to improve gas mileage in their cars. Beating the competition by even the slimmest of margins can give valuable bragging rights within a segment.

In this infographic, we’ve used data from the EPA’s 2022 Automotive Trends Report to list off the most fuel efficient cars from 1975 to today.

Editor’s note: This is from a U.S. government agency, so the data shown skews towards cars sold in North America.

Data Overview

All of the information in the above infographic is listed in the table below. Data was only available in 5-year increments up until 2005, after which it switches to annual.

Model YearMakeModelReal World Fuel Economy (mpg)Engine Type
1975HondaCivic28.3Gas
1980VWRabbit40.3Diesel
1985ChevroletSprint49.6Gas
1990GeoMetro53.4Gas
1995HondaCivic47.3Gas
2000HondaInsight57.4Hybrid
2005HondaInsight53.3Hybrid
2006HondaInsight53Hybrid
2007ToyotaPrius46.2Hybrid
2008ToyotaPrius46.2Hybrid
2009ToyotaPrius46.2Hybrid
2010HondaFCX60.2FCEV
2011BMWActive E100.6EV
2012Mitsubishii-MiEV109EV
2013ToyotaiQ EV117EV
2014BMWi3121.3EV
2015BMWi3121.3EV
2016BMWi3121.3EV
2017HyundaiIoniq Electric132.6EV
2018HyundaiIoniq Electric132.6EV
2019HyundaiIoniq Electric132.6EV
2020Tesla3138.6EV
2021Tesla3139.1EV

From this dataset, we can identify three distinct approaches to maximizing fuel efficiency.

Downsizing

Prior to 2000, the best way for automakers to achieve good fuel efficiency was by downsizing. Making cars smaller (lighter) meant they could also be fitted with very small engines.

For example, the 1985 Chevrolet Sprint was rated at 49.6 MPG, but had a sluggish 0-60 time of 15 seconds.

Hybrids

The 2000s saw the introduction of mass-market hybrid vehicles like the Honda Insight and Toyota Prius. By including a small battery to support the combustion engine, automakers could achieve good MPGs without sacrificing so heavily on size.

While the Insight achieved better fuel economy than the Prius, it was the latter that became synonymous with the term “hybrid”. This was largely due to the Prius’ more practical 4-door design.

The following table compares annual U.S. sales figures for both models. Insight sales have fluctuated drastically because Honda has produced the model in several short spans (1999-2006, 2009-2014, 2018-2022).

YearInsight SalesPrius Sales
2005666107,155
2006722106,971
20073181,221
2008-158,884
200920,572150,831
201020,962140,928
201115,549136,464
20126,619236,655
20134,802234,228
20143,965207,372
20151,458184,794
201667136,629
20173108,661
201812,51387,590
201923,68669,718
202015,93243,525
202118,68559,010
20227,62833,352

Source: goodcarbadcar.net

The Prius may have dominated the hybrid market for a long time, but it too has run into troubles. Sales have been declining since 2014, even setting historic lows in recent years.

There are several reasons behind this trend, with one being a wider availability of hybrid models from other brands. We also can’t ignore the release of the Tesla Model 3, which began shipping to customers in 2017.

Electric Vehicles

We’re currently in the middle of a historic transition to electric vehicles. However, because EVs do not use fuel, the EPA had to develop a new system called MPGe (miles per gallon of gasoline-equivalent).

This new metric gives us the ability to compare the efficiency of EVs with traditional gas-powered cars. An underlying assumption of MPGe is that 33.7 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity is comparable to the energy content of a gallon of fuel.

The most fuel efficient car you can buy today is the 2023 Lucid Air, which achieves 140 MPGe. Close behind it is the 2023 Tesla Model 3 RWD, which is rated at 132 MPGe.

Check out this page to see the EPA’s top 10 most efficient vehicles for 2023.

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