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Which Cities are Fueling America’s Craft Beer Boom?

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breweries state per capita

The craft beer industry in the United States has been a bright spot of the economy for nearly a decade.

With an economic impact of $23.5 billion and the number of operating breweries in the U.S. totaling well over 5,000 today, the industry is clearly past the point of being a millennial fad. There are more choices available than ever before, and this appears to signal a broader shift in consumer preference.

Below is a look at both historical and recent craft beer industry numbers:

craft brewery statistics

Mapping Craft Beer Hubs

The craft beer boom is a nation-wide trend, but there are certain cities that have an outsize influence on the industry both in volume and reputation. Recently, The Pudding’s Russell Goldenberg looked to answer the question: which city is the microbrew capital of the U.S.?

Goldenberg looks at both quality of beer (based on user ratings), as well as the quantity of nearby breweries as criteria. Below are the Top 10 cities based on equal weights for both categories, with an end result that may be unexpected for some.

Top Breweries in the United States

Extremely high user ratings helped power mid-sized cities like Santa Rosa and Anchorage up the rankings. The offerings in these places, such as Russian River Brewing and Midnight Sun Brewing Company, are among the top rated brewers in the country, setting a high bar for quality.

However, in terms of the pure quantity of breweries, cities like Denver, Portland, and San Diego can’t be beat. The Denver “Beer Triangle” has over 72 breweries alone, while Portland is a regular destination for beer lovers from all over the continent.

New Breweries Per Capita

Looking at the state level, per capita data paints an interesting picture of where craft beer hot spots are beginning to emerge:

breweries state per capita
Browse the full list here.

Most notably, Vermont is wild about craft beer, though their industry is more uniformly spread throughout the state (as opposed to clustered in a single city). A recent count shows 68 active breweries in a state with just 625,000 in population – a very impressive beer-to-drinker ratio.

Bubble Brewing?

Will the craft beer boom continue, or is there already too much froth in some cities?

Currently, 75% of Americans live within 10 miles of a brewery, but there are still plenty of population centers that could support a local brewery. Savvy marketing, unique offerings, and millennial preferences for local products may continue to push the craft brew trend into new parts of the country, so this will be an interesting list to revisit in a few years.

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Meet Generation Z: The Newest Member to the Workforce

As Millennials enter their early-30s, the focus is now shifting to Generation Z – a group that is just starting to enter the workforce for the first time.

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Every generation approaches the workplace differently.

While talk over the last decade has largely focused on understanding the work habits and attitudes of Millennials, it’s already time for a new generation to enter the fold.

Generation Z, the group born after the Millennials, is entering their early adult years and starting their young careers. What makes them different, and how will they approach things differently than past generations?

Meet Generation Z

Today’s infographic comes to us from ZeroCater, and it will help introduce you to the newest entrant to the modern workforce: Generation Z.

Meet Generation Z: The Newest Member to the Workforce

There is no exact consensus on the definition of Generation Z, and demographers can differ on where it starts. Some have Gen Z beginning as early as the mid-1990s, while others see it starting in the mid-2000s.

Regardless, Generation Z is the group that follows the Millennials – and many Gen Zers are wrapping up high school, finishing up their university degrees, or looking to get their first real jobs.

Millennials vs. Gen Z

While generational differences cast a wide net and don’t necessarily apply to every individual, here is what demographers say are some key similarities and differences between Gen Z and Millennials.

MillennialsGeneration Z
Raised by Baby BoomersRaised by Gen Xers
Grew up during an economic boomGrew up during a recession
Tend to be idealisticTend to be pragmatic
Focused on having experiencesFocused on saving money
Mobile pioneersMobile natives
Prefer brands that share their valuesPrefer brands that feel authentic
Prefer Facebook and InstagramPrefer Snapchat and Instagram

Generation Z tends to be more pragmatic, approaching both their education and career differently than Millennials. It appears that Gen Z is also approaching money in a unique way compared to past groups.

What to Expect?

Generation Z does not remember a time when the internet did not exist – and as such, it’s not surprising to learn that 50% of Gen Z spends 10 hours a day connected online, and 70% watches YouTube for two hours a day or more.

But put aside this ultra-connectivity, and Gen Zers have some unique and possibly unexpected traits. Gen Z prefers face-to-face interactions in the workplace, and also expects to work harder than past groups. Gen Z is also the most diverse generation (49% non-white) and values racial equality as a top issue. Finally, Gen Z is possibly one of the most practical generations, valuing things like saving money and getting stable jobs.

You may already have Gen Zers in your workplace – but if you don’t, you will soon.

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Demographics

The Crime Rate Perception Gap

There’s a persistent belief across America that crime is on the rise. This graphic amalgamates crime rate data from the FBI to show a very different reality.

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crime perceptions

The Crime Rate Perception Gap

There’s a persistent belief across America that crime is on the rise.

Since the late 1980s, Gallup has been polling people on their perception of crime in the United States, and consistently, the majority of respondents indicate that they see crime as becoming more prevalent. As well, a recent poll showed that more than two-thirds of Americans feel that today’s youth are less safe from crime and harm than the previous generation.

Even the highest ranking members of the government have been suggesting that the country is in the throes of a crime wave.

We have a crime problem. […] this is a dangerous permanent trend that places the health and safety of the American people at risk.

— Jeff Sessions, Former Attorney General

Is crime actually more prevalent in society? Today’s graphic, amalgamating crime rate data from the FBI, shows a very different reality.

Data vs Perception

In the early ’90s, crime in the U.S. was an undeniable concern – particularly in struggling urban centers. The country’s murder rate was nearly double what it is today, and statistics for all types of crime were through the roof.

Since that era, crime rates in the United States have undergone a remarkably steady decline, but public perception has been slow to catch up. In a 2016 survey, 57% of registered voters said crime in the U.S. had gotten worse since 2008, despite crime rates declining by double-digit percentages during that time period.

There are many theories as to why crime rates took such a dramatic U-turn, and while that matter is still a subject for debate, there’s clear data on who is and isn’t being arrested.

Are Millennials Killing Crime?

Media outlets have accused millennials of the killing off everything from department stores to commuting by car, but there’s another behavior this generation is eschewing as well – criminality.

Compared to previous generations, people under the age of 39 are simply being arrested in smaller numbers. In fact, much of the decline in overall crime can be attributed to people in this younger age bracket. In contrast, the arrest rate for older Americans actually rose slightly.

Arrests by Age Group

There’s no telling whether the overall trend will continue.

In fact, the most recent data shows that the murder rate has ticked up ever-so-slightly in recent years, while violent and property crimes continue to be on the decline.

A Global Perspective

Perceptions of increasing criminality are echoed in many other developed economies as well. From Italy to South Korea, the prevailing sentiment is that youth are living in a society that is less safe than in previous generations.

global crime perceptions

As the poll above demonstrates, perception gaps exist in somewhat unexpected places.

In Sweden, where violent crime is actually increasing, 53% of people believe that crime will be worse for today’s youth. Contrast that with Australia, where crime rates have declined in a similar pattern as in the United States – yet, more than two-thirds of Aussie respondents believe that crime will be worse for today’s youth.

One significant counterpoint to this trend is China, where respondents felt that crime was less severe today than in the past.

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