Which Countries Feature Women on Banknotes? - Visual Capitalist
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Which Countries Feature Women on Banknotes?

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notable women on banknotes

Visualizing the Women on Banknotes Worldwide

A study by Swedish loan company Advisa analyzed 1,006 current international banknotes and found that only 15% featured images of women.

Who are these women, and which countries feature them on their bills?

This graphic by Ivett Kovács and Gabrielle Merite visualizes women on banknotes around the world, showing their main occupations, and the value of the banknotes they’re featured on.

The List: Women on Bills

To create this graphic, Ivett used data from the Standard Catalogue of World Paper Money, compiled by Vox.

According to the dataset, Queen Elizabeth II is the most featured woman worldwide.

CountryDenomination(s)WomanDescription
🇦🇱 Albania100 lekëQueen TeutaQueen of Illyria
🇦🇬 Antigua and Barbuda$5, $10, $20, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇦🇷 Argentina100 pesosEva PerónFirst Lady of Argentina
🇦🇺 Australia$50Edith CowanSuffragette
🇦🇺 Australia$10Mary GilmorePoet, journalist
🇦🇺 Australia$100Nellie MelbaOpera singer
🇦🇺 Australia$5Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇧🇸 Bahamas$10, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇧🇿 Belize$2, $10, $20, $50Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇨🇦 Canada$20Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇨🇻 Cape Verde2000 escudosCesária ÉvoraSinger
🇰🇾 Cayman Islands$1, $5, $10, $25, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇨🇱 Chile5000 pesosGabriela MistralNobel Prize winner
🇨🇴 Colombia10000 pesosPolicarpa SalavarrietaSeamstress, spy
🇨🇷 Costa Rica20000 colonesCarmen LyraWriter
🇨🇿 Czech Republic50 korunaAgnes of BohemiaBohemian princess
🇨🇿 Czech Republic500 korunaBožena NěmcováWriter
🇨🇿 Czech Republic2000 korunaEmmy DestinnOpera singer
🇩🇲 Dominica$5, $10, $20, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇩🇴 Dominican Republic200 pesosMirabal sistersSisters who opposed dictatorship
🇩🇴 Dominican Republic500 pesosSalomé UreñaPoet and pedagogist
🇫🇰 Falkland Islands5, 10, 20, 50 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇬🇪 Georgia50 lariQueen TamarThe Queen Regnant of Georgia
🇬🇮 Gibraltar5, 10, 20, 50 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇬🇩 Grenada$5, $10, $20, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇬🇬 Guernsey5, 10, 20, 50 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇭🇹 Haiti10 gourdesCatherine Flon ArcahaieCreated Haitian flag
🇮🇸 Iceland5000 kronurRagnheiður JónsdóttirSeamstress
🇮🇲 Isle of Man1, 5, ,10, 20, 50 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇯🇲 Jamaica$500Nanny of the MaroonsNational heroine of Jamaica
🇯🇵 Japan5000 yenHiguchi IchiyōWriter
🇯🇪 Jersey1 ,5, 10, 20, 50 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇰🇬 Kyrgyzstan50 somKurmanjan DatkaStateswoman
🇲🇼 Malawi200 kwachaRose Lomathinda ChibamboLeader of African Congress
🇲🇽 Mexico500 pesosFrida Kahlo (and Diego Rivera)Artist, Communist Party militant
🇲🇽 Mexico200 pesosSor Juana Inés de la CruzNun, scholar, poet
🇳🇿 New Zealand$10Kate SheppardSuffragette
🇳🇿 New Zealand$20Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇳🇬 Nigeria20 nairaLadi KwaliPotter
🇳🇴 Norway100 kronerKirsten FalgstadOpera singer
🇳🇴 Norway500 kronerSigrid UndsetNobel Prize winner
🇵🇪 Peru200 solesRose of LimaFirst catholic saint of the Americas
🇵🇭 Philippines500 pesosCorazon C. AquinoFirst female president in Phillipines
🇵🇭 Philippines1000 pesosJosefa Llanes EscodaFounder, Philippines Girl Scouts
🇰🇳 St. Kitts and Nevis$5, $10, $20, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇱🇨 St. Lucia$5, $10, $20, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 Scotland50 poundsMary SlessorMissionary, activist
🇷🇸 Serbia200 dinarNadežda PetrovićPainter
🇰🇷 South Korea50000 wonShin SaimdangArtist, poet
🇻🇨 St Vincent and Grenadines$5, $10, $20, $50, $100Queen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇸🇭 St. Helena5, 10, 20 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇸🇪 Sweden20 kronorAstrid LindgrenAuthor of "Pippi Lockstocking"
🇸🇪 Sweden50 kronorJenny LindOpera singer
🇸🇪 Sweden500 kronorBirgit NilssonOpera singer
🇸🇪 Sweden100 kronorGreta GarboActress
🇨🇭 Switzerland50 francsSophie Taeuber-ArpPainter, sculptor
🇸🇾 Syria500 poundsZenobiaQueen of the Palmyrene Empire
🇹🇳 Tunisia10 dinarsDidoQueen & founder of Carthage
🇹🇷 Turkey50 liraFatma Aliye TopuzFirst female Muslim novelist
🇺🇦 Ukraine200 hryvenLesya UkrainkaPoet, writer
🇬🇧 United Kingdom5, 10, 20, 50 poundsQueen Elizabeth IIQueen of U.K., CAN, AUS, NZ+
🇬🇧 United Kingdom5 poundsElizabeth FryPrison reformer
🇺🇾 Uruguay1000 pesosJuana de IbarbourouPoet
🇻🇪 Venezuela20 bolívaresLuisa Cáceres de ArismendiHeroine of War of Independence

Canada was the first country to use an image of Queen Elizabeth II on their money. In 1935, Canada printed her on a $20 banknote—the British monarch was only a 9-year-old princess at the time. Now, Queen E appears on a variety of different banknotes in 19 different countries. In the Cayman Islands, she’s on their $1, $5, $25, $50, and $100.

A few other queens or royal members have made it onto different banknotes too—Georgia’s 50 lari note has an image of Queen Tamar, who was the Queen of Georgia from 1184 to 1213, and Albania’s 100 lekë features Queen Teuta, a 3rd century queen of an Illyrian tribe.

While royals (especially Queen Elizabeth II) are frequently featured on bills worldwide, women in other positions have also made it onto banknotes.

Authors, singers, poets, and painters are featured on a number of different currencies. For instance, Sweden has Astrid Lindgren—the author of Pippi Longstocking—on their 20 kronor.

Sweden also features three other women on their bills: Birgit Nilsson, Jenny Lind, and Greta Garbo, making their banknote features an even 50/50 split between men and women.

A Quick History of Women Featured on U.S. Banknotes

Essentially the only time a woman was prominently featured on a U.S. banknote was in the late 19th century when Martha Washington—the wife of President George Washington—appeared on a $1 silver certificate.

martha washington 1 dollar silver note

This dearth of women on U.S. banknotes may soon come to an end. The Biden administration is now speeding up efforts to put Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, an initiative that was delayed in recent years. When the plan was initially introduced by then Treasury secretary, Jacob Lew, in 2016, the new design was set to be unveiled in 2020 on the centennial of the 19th Amendment (which granted women the right to vote).

Women are Still Underrepresented

It’s worth noting that women are still consistently underrepresented in positions of power, and in the media.

And even when women do hold authoritative positions, research has shown they’re taken less seriously than their male counterparts.

That’s why events like International Women’s Day exist. It’s not just a time to celebrate women’s achievements—it’s also a day to shed light on existing gender bias, and ultimately take action to help combat gender inequality.

Want to be part of the change? Learn more about Women’s Day, or donate to fundraising efforts for female-focused charities.

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Politics

Which Countries Trust Their Government, and Which Ones Don’t?

There is a clear correlation between trust in government and trust in public institutions, but a few countries buck the trend.

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Which Countries Trust Their Government, and Which Ones Don’t?

In many countries around the world, vast portions of the population do not trust their own government.

Lack of faith in government and politics is nothing new, but in times of uncertainty, that lack of trust can coalesce into movements that challenge the authority of ruling parties and even threaten the stability of nations.

This visualization uses data from the Ipsos Global Trustworthiness Monitor to look at how much various populations trust their government and public institutions.

Tracking Trust in Government

Since the beginning of the pandemic, global trust in government has improved by eight percentage points, but that is only a small improvement on an otherwise low score.

At the country level, feelings towards government can vary widely. India, Germany, Netherlands, and Malaysia had the highest government trust levels.

Many of the countries with the lowest levels of trust were located in Latin America. This makes sense, as trust in politicians in this region is almost non-existent. For example, in Colombia, only 4% of the population consider politicians trustworthy. In Argentina, that figure falls to just 3%.

Trust in Public Institutions

Broadly speaking, people trust their public services more than the governments in charge of managing and funding them. This makes sense as civil servants fare much better than politicians and government ministers in trustworthiness.

chart showing global trust in professions. Politicians and government ministers rank the lowest.

As our main chart demonstrates, there is a correlation between faith in government and trust in public institutions. There are clear “high trust” and “low trust” groupings in the countries included in the polling, but there is also a third group that stands out—the countries that have high trust in public institutions, but not in their government. Leading this group is Japan, which has a stark difference in trust between public services and politicians. There are many factors that explain this difference, such as values, corruption levels, and the reliability of public services in various countries.

While trust scores for government improved slightly during the pandemic, trust in public institutions stayed nearly the same.

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Misc

Explainer: What to Know About Monkeypox

What is monkeypox, and what risk does it pose to the public? This infographic breaks down the symptoms, transmission, and more.

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Explainer: What to Know About Monkeypox

The COVID-19 pandemic is still fresh in the minds of the people around the world, so it comes as no surprise that recent outbreaks of another virus are grabbing headlines.

Monkeypox outbreaks have now been reported in multiple countries, and it has scientists paying close attention. For everyone else, numerous questions come to the surface:

  • How serious is this virus?
  • How contagious is it?
  • Could monkeypox develop into a new pandemic?

Below, we answer these questions and more.

What is Monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a virus in the Orthopoxvirus genus which also includes the variola virus (which causes smallpox) and the cowpox virus. The primary symptoms include fever, swollen lymph nodes, and a distinctive bumpy rash.

There are two major strains of the virus that pose very different risks:

  • Congo Basin strain: 1 in 10 people infected with this strain have died
  • West African strain: Approximately 1 in 100 people infected with this strain died

At the moment, health authorities in the UK have indicated they’re seeing the milder strain in patients there.

Where did Monkeypox Originate From?

The virus was originally discovered in the Democratic Republic of Congo in monkeys kept for research purposes (hence the name). Eventually, the virus made the jump to humans more than a decade after its discovery in 1958.

It is widely assumed that vaccination against another similar virus, smallpox, helped keep monkeypox outbreaks from occurring in human populations. Ironically, the successful eradication of smallpox, and eventual winding down of that vaccine program, has opened the door to a new viral threat. There is now a growing population of people who no longer have immunity against the virus.

Now that travel restrictions are lifting in many parts of the world, viruses are now able to hop between nations again. As of the publishing of this article, a handful of cases have now been reported in the U.S., Canada, the UK, and a number of European countries.

On the upside, contact tracing has helped authorities piece together the transmission of the virus. While cases are rare in Europe and North America, it is considered endemic in parts of West Africa. For example, the World Health Organization reports that Nigeria has experienced over 550 reported monkeypox cases from 2017 to today. The current UK outbreak originated from an individual who returned from a trip to Nigeria.

Could Monkeypox become a new pandemic?

Monkeypox, which primarily spreads through animal-to-human interaction, is not known to spread easily between humans. Most individuals infected with monkeypox pass the virus to between zero and one person, so outbreaks typically fizzle out. For this reason, the fact that outbreaks are occurring in several countries simultaneously is concerning for health authorities and organizations that monitor viral transmission. Experts are entertaining the possibility that the virus’ rate of transmission has increased.

Images of people covered in monkeypox lesions are shocking, and people are understandably concerned by this virus, but the good news is that members of the general public have little to fear at this stage.

I think the risk to the general public at this point, from the information we have, is very, very low.
–Tom Inglesby, Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

» For up-to-date information on monkeypox cases, check out Global.Health’s tracking spreadsheet

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