Mapping Out The Richest Billionaires in Each Country
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Mapping Out the Richest Billionaires in Each Country

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Map of the richest billionaires in each country

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Mapping Out The Richest Billionaires in Each Country

While there are nearly 8 billion people in the world, just over 3,000 are billionaires as of November 2022. This tiny group of people is worth nearly $11.8 trillion—Equivalent to about 11.8% of global GDP.

Where do these billionaires live? This graphic by Truman Du uses data from Forbes to map out the richest billionaires around the world.

The Full List

As it turns out, billionaires are a lot more geographically concentrated than you might think.

In fact, of the 195 officially recognized countries around the world, only 76 are home to billionaires. And even within these countries, there’s vast disparities between the quantity of billionaires.

Here’s a breakdown of all the countries that have at least one billionaire. For countries with more than one, we’ve highlighted the billionaire with the highest net worth as of November 28, 2022:

Country/territoryNameNet worth ($B)Main source of wealth (sector)
🇩🇿 AlgeriaIssad Rebrab5.1food
🇦🇷 ArgentinaMarcos Galperin4.0e-commerce
🇦🇲 ArmeniaRuben Vardanyan1.3investment banking
🇦🇺 AustraliaGina Rinehart27.9mining
🇦🇹 AustriaGeorg Stumpf7.9real estate, construction
🇧🇩 BangladeshMuhammed Aziz Khan1.0power
🇧🇧 BarbadosRihanna1.4music, cosmetics
🇧🇪 BelgiumEric Wittouck9.0investments
🇧🇿 BelizeKenneth Dart4.0investments
🇧🇷 BrazilJorge Paulo Lemann15.6beer
🇧🇬 BulgariaGeorgi & Kiril Domuschiev1.9animal health, investments
🇨🇦 CanadaDavid Thomson53.2media
🇨🇱 ChileIris Fontbona19.6mining
🇨🇳 ChinaZhong Shanshan66.7beverages, pharmaceuticals
🇨🇴 ColombiaLuis Carlos Sarmiento6.3banking
🇨🇾 CyprusJohn Fredriksen11.4shipping
🇨🇿 CzechiaRenata Kellnerova16.0finance, telecommunications
🇩🇰 DenmarkAnders Holch Povlsen11.9fashion retail
🇪🇬 EgyptNassef Sawiris7.2construction, investments
🇪🇪 EstoniaKristo Kaarmann1.4payments, banking
🇫🇮 FinlandAntti Herlin3.9elevators, escalators
🇫🇷 FranceBernard Arnault179.5LVMH
🇬🇪 GeorgiaBidzina Ivanishvili4.8investments
🇩🇪 GermanyBeate Heister & Karl Albrecht Jr.35.1supermarkets
🇬🇷 GreeceVicky Safra7.1banking
🇬🇬 GuernseyStephen Lansdown2.3financial services
🇭🇰 Hong KongLi Ka-shing33.0diversified
🇭🇺 HungarySandor Csanyi1.1finance, real estate
🇮🇸 IcelandThor Bjorgolfsson2.5investments
🇮🇳 IndiaGautam Adani133.6infrastructure, commodities
🇮🇩 IndonesiaR. Budi Hartono23.4banking, tobacco
🇮🇪 IrelandJohn Collison & Patrick Collison8,1payments software
🇮🇱 IsraelEyal Ofer14.4real estate, shipping
🇮🇹 ItalyGiovanni Ferrero34.4Nutella, chocolates
🇯🇵 JapanTadashi Yanai29.2fashion retail
🇰🇿 KazakhstanVladimir Kim5.0mining
🇱🇧 LebanonTaha Mikati2.8telecom
🇱🇮 LiechtensteinChristoph Zeller2.2dental materials
🇲🇴 MacauHoi Kin Hong1.2real estate
🇲🇾 MalaysiaQuek Leng Chan10.2banking, property
🇲🇽 MexicoCarlos Slim Helu86.2telecom
🇲🇨 MonacoStefano Pessina9.3drugstores
🇲🇦 MoroccoAziz Akhannouch1.8petroleum
🇳🇵 NepalBinod Chaudhary1.5diversified
🇳🇱 NetherlandsCharlene de Carvalho-Heineken15.0Heineken
🇳🇿 New ZealandGraeme Hart10.1investments
🇳🇬 NigeriaAliko Dangote12.9cement, sugar
🇳🇴 NorwayAndreas Halvorsen6.6hedge funds
🇴🇲 OmanSuhail Bahwan2.0diversified
🇵🇪 PeruCarlos Rodriguez-Pastor4.3finance
🇵🇭 PhilippinesManuel Villar7.0real estate
🇵🇱 PolandMichal Solowow6.0investments
🇵🇹 PortugalMaria Fernanda Amorim4.5energy, investments
🇶🇦 QatarFaisal Bin Qassim Al Thani1.9hotels
🇷🇴 RomaniaIon Stoica & Matei Zaharia1.6data analytics
🇷🇺 RussiaAndrey Melnichenko27.0coal, fertilizers
🇸🇬 SingaporeLi Xiting16.6medical devices
🇸🇰 SlovakiaIvan Chrenko1.6real estate
🇿🇦 South AfricaJohann Rupert9.0luxury goods
🇰🇷 South KoreaJay Y. Lee7.9samsung
🇪🇸 SpainAmancio Ortega62.5Zara
🇰🇳 St. Kitts and NevisMyron Wentz1.3health products
🇸🇿 Swaziland (Eswatini)Nathan Kirsh5.4retail, real estate
🇸🇪 SwedenStefan Persson15.3H&M
🇨🇭SwitzerlandGuillaume Pousaz23.0fintech
🇹🇼 TaiwanZhang Congyuan6.7shoes
🇹🇿 TanzaniaMohammed Dewji1.5diversified
🇹🇭 ThailandSarath Ratanavadi12.2energy
🇹🇷 TurkeyIbrahim Erdemoglu6.5carpet
🇺🇦 UkraineRinat Akhmetov4.3steel, coal
🇦🇪 United Arab EmiratesPavel Durov15.1messaging app
🇬🇧 United KingdomMichael Platt15.2hedge funds
🇺🇸 United StatesElon Musk191.2Tesla, SpaceX
🇻🇪 VenezuelaJuan Carlos Escotet3.2banking
🇻🇳 VietnamPham Nhat Vuong4.7diversified
🇿🇼 ZimbabweStrive Masiyiwa1.2telecom

The United States is well known to have one of the highest concentrations of billionaires. It’s home to over 900, with Elon Musk the wealthiest of them all with a staggering net worth of over $191 billion in November 2022. That makes him not just the richest billionaire in America, but the richest person in the world.

China has the second highest concentration of billionaires, with 400 ultra-wealthy that have a combined net worth of $1.45 trillion. China’s richest billionaire, Zhong Shanshan, is the founder of the Nongfu Spring beverage company.

Interestingly, there are no clear patterns when it comes to the type of industry or sector that these billionaires are involved in. The exception is the U.S., where a significant number of billionaires are linked to the tech industry.

And it’s important to note that some heads of states are reportedly billionaires, and in many cases might be the wealthiest people in their respective countries. But their wealth is often a state secret, well-diversified, and too difficult to accurately estimate.

Male vs. Female Billionaires

One trend that does stand out is the number of men versus women who are billionaires. Of the 76 billionaires on the list, only 7 are women.

This pattern is also evident when looking at the entire billionaire population—of the 3,311 billionaires worldwide, only 12.9% are women.

It’s worth mentioning that this population of billionaire women is rising. According to Forbes, the 2021 list included 328 women, 36% more than in 2020.

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Economy

The $16 Trillion European Union Economy

This chart shows the contributors to the EU economy through a percentage-wise distribution of country-level GDP.

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The $16 Trillion European Union Economy

The European Union has the third-largest economy in the world, accounting for one-sixth of global trade. All together, 27 member countries make up one internal market allowing free movement of goods, services, capital and people.

But how did this sui generis (a class by itself) political entity come into being?

A Brief History of the EU

After the devastating aftermath of the World War II, Western Europe saw a concerted move towards regional peace and security by promoting democracy and protecting human rights.

Crucially, the Schuman Declaration was presented in 1950. The coal and steel industries of Western Europe were integrated under common management, preventing countries from turning on each other and creating weapons of war. Six countries signed on — the eventual founders of the EU.

Here’s a list of all 27 members of the EU and the year they joined.

CountryYear of entry
🇧🇪 Belgium1958
🇫🇷 France1958
🇩🇪 Germany1958
🇮🇹 Italy1958
🇱🇺 Luxembourg1958
🇳🇱 Netherlands1958
🇩🇰 Denmark1973
🇮🇪 Ireland1973
🇬🇷 Greece1981
🇵🇹 Portugal1986
🇪🇸 Spain1986
🇦🇹 Austria1995
🇫🇮 Finland1995
🇸🇪 Sweden1995
🇨🇾 Cyprus2004
🇨🇿 Czechia2004
🇪🇪 Estonia2004
🇭🇺 Hungary2004
🇱🇻 Latvia2004
🇱🇹 Lithuania2004
🇲🇹 Malta2004
🇵🇱 Poland2004
🇸🇰 Slovakia2004
🇸🇮 Slovenia2004
🇧🇬 Bulgaria2007
🇷🇴 Romania2007
🇭🇷 Croatia2013

Greater economic and security cooperation followed over the next four decades, along with the addition of new members. These tighter relationships disincentivized conflict, and Western Europe—after centuries of constant war—has seen unprecedented peace for the last 80 years.

The modern version of the EU can trace its origin to 1993, with the adoption of the name, ‘the European Union,’ the birth of a single market, and the promise to use a single currency—the euro.

Since then the EU has become an economic and political force to reckon with. Its combined gross domestic product (GDP) stood at $16.6 trillion in 2022, after the U.S. ($26 trillion) and China ($19 trillion.)

ℹ️ GDP is a broad indicator of the economic activity within a country. It measures the total value of economic output—goods and services—produced within a given time frame by both the private and public sectors.

Front Loading the EU Economy

For the impressive numbers it shows however, the European Union’s economic might is held up by three economic giants, per data from the International Monetary Fund. Put together, the GDPs of Germany ($4 trillion), France ($2.7 trillion) and Italy ($1.9 trillion) make up more than half of the EU’s entire economic output.

These three countries are also the most populous in the EU, and together with Spain and Poland, account for 66% of the total population of the EU.

Here’s a table of all 27 member states and the percentage they contribute to the EU’s gross domestic product.

RankCountry GDP (Billion USD)% of the EU Economy
1.🇩🇪 Germany4,031.124.26%
2.🇫🇷 France2,778.116.72%
3.🇮🇹 Italy1,997.012.02%
4.🇪🇸 Spain1,390.08.37%
5.🇳🇱 Netherlands990.65.96%
6.🇵🇱 Poland716.34.31%
7.🇸🇪 Sweden603.93.64%
8.🇧🇪 Belgium589.53.55%
9.🇮🇪 Ireland519.83.13%
10.🇦🇹 Austria468.02.82%
11.🇩🇰 Denmark386.72.33%
12.🇷🇴 Romania299.91.81%
13.🇨🇿 Czechia295.61.78%
14.🇫🇮 Finland281.41.69%
15.🇵🇹 Portugal255.91.54%
16.🇬🇷 Greece222.01.34%
17.🇭🇺 Hungary184.71.11%
18.🇸🇰 Slovakia112.40.68%
19.🇧🇬 Bulgaria85.00.51%
20.🇱🇺 Luxembourg82.20.49%
21.🇭🇷 Croatia69.40.42%
22.🇱🇹 Lithuania68.00.41%
23.🇸🇮 Slovenia62.20.37%
24.🇱🇻 Latvia40.60.24%
25.🇪🇪 Estonia39.10.24%
26.🇨🇾 Cyprus26.70.16%
27.🇲🇹 Malta17.20.10%
Total16,613.1100%

The top-heaviness continues. By adding Spain ($1.3 trillion) and the Netherlands ($990 billion), the top five make up nearly 70% of the EU’s GDP. That goes up to 85% when the top 10 countries are included.

That means less than half of the 27 member states make up $14 trillion of the $16 trillion EU economy.

Older Members, Larger Share

Aside from the most populous members having bigger economies, another pattern emerges, with the time the country has spent in the EU.

Five of the six founders of the EU—Germany, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium—are in the top 10 biggest economies of the EU. Ireland and Denmark, the next entrants into the union (1973) are ranked 9th and 11th respectively. The bottom 10 countries all joined the EU post-2004.

The UK—which joined the bloc in 1973 and formally left in 2020—would have been the second-largest economy in the region at $3.4 trillion.

Sectoral Analysis of the EU

The EU has four primary sectors of economic output: services, industry, construction, and agriculture (including fishing and forestry.) Below is an analysis of some of these sectors and the countries which contribute the most to it. All figures are from Eurostat.

Services and Tourism

The EU economy relies heavily on the services sector, accounting for more than 70% of the value added to the economy in 2020. It also is the sector with the highest share of employment in the EU, at 73%.

In Luxembourg, which has a large financial services sector, 87% of the country’s gross domestic product came from the services sector.

Tourism economies like Malta and Cyprus also had an above 80% share of services in their GDP.

Industry

Meanwhile 20% of the EU’s gross domestic product came from industry, with Ireland’s economy having the most share (40%) in its GDP. Czechia, Slovenia and Poland also had a significant share of industry output.

Mining coal and lignite in the EU saw a brief rebound in output in 2021, though levels continued to be subdued.

RankSector% of the EU Economy
1.Services72.4%
2.Industry20.1%
3.Construction5.6%
4.Agriculture, forestry and fishing1.8%

Agriculture

Less than 2% of the EU’s economy relies on agriculture, forestry and fishing. Romania, Latvia, and Greece feature as contributors to this sector, however the share in total output in each country is less than 5%. Bulgaria has the highest employment (16%) in this sector compared to other EU members.

Energy

The EU imports nearly 60% of its energy requirements. Until the end of 2021, Russia was the biggest exporter of petroleum and natural gas to the region. After the war in Ukraine that share has steadily decreased from nearly 25% to 15% for petroleum liquids and from nearly 40% to 15% for natural gas, per Eurostat.

Headwinds, High Seas

The IMF has a gloomy outlook for Europe heading into 2023. War in Ukraine, spiraling energy costs, high inflation, and stagnant wage growth means that EU leaders are facing “severe trade-offs and tough policy decisions.”

Reforms—to relieve supply constraints in the labor and energy markets—are key to increasing growth and relieving price pressures, according to the international body. The IMF projects that the EU will grow 0.7% in 2023.

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