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Mapped: The Price of Starbucks Coffee, by Country

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A map of the world with the price of a Starbucks Tall Latte listed against each country.

Mapped: The Price of Starbucks by Country

In 1971, three former students from the University of San Francisco set up the first Starbucks at Seattle’s Pike Place Market, selling fresh roasted coffee beans, teas, and spices from around the world. This was a relatively humble beginning for what is now the largest coffeehouse chain in the world.

Today, Starbucks boasts 32,000 stores across 80 countries, second only to McDonald’s in the fast-food chain business. And like McDonald’s, the price of a coffee at Starbucks varies wildly depending on the country you’re in.

This map made by SavingSpot has the answer to which country has the most and least expensive Starbucks coffee, for those connoisseurs who want to get the most bang for their (Star)buck—or for those who want to examine relative cost and purchasing power.

Which Country Has the Most Expensive Starbucks Coffee?

The underlying data for this map uses a combination of sources, including delivery apps, Google Reviews, menu images, and desk research, all cross-checked to come up with the price of a Tall Latte per country (converted to USD).

Per their findings, the most expensive Tall Latte (12 oz) in the world can be found in Switzerland for $7.17. On the other hand, the same drink can be bought for a little over a dollar in Türkiye.

Here’s the full rankings of the “Tall Latte Index”:

CountryTall Latte Price
Türkiye$1.31
Brazil$1.96
Aruba$2.22
Egypt$2.23
Peru$2.49
Colombia$2.50
South Africa$2.64
Bulgaria$2.69
Morocco$2.81
Italy$2.84
Russia$2.91
Cyprus$2.97
Malaysia$3.04
Indonesia$3.08
Bolivia$3.19
Guatemala$3.23
Cambodia$3.25
Philippines$3.26
United States$3.26
Andorra$3.28
Romania$3.29
Hungary$3.34
New Zealand$3.34
Trinidad and Tobago$3.39
Azerbaijan$3.41
Vietnam$3.42
Austria$3.48
Belgium$3.52
Jordan$3.53
India$3.56
Poland$3.56
Japan$3.57
Portugal$3.59
Thailand$3.64
Bahamas$3.75
Slovakia$3.80
Jamaica$3.84
Canada$3.85
Greece$3.92
Czech Republic$3.93
Spain$3.95
Australia$3.97
Puerto Rico$4.05
Oman$4.09
South Korea$4.11
Qatar$4.12
Costa Rica$4.22
China$4.23
Bahrain$4.24
El Salvador$4.25
Saudi Arabia$4.27 (Iced Caffè Latte)
UAE-Dubai$4.29
Kuwait$4.30
Ireland$4.39
Uruguay$4.42
Netherlands$4.44
Germany$4.49
Argentina$4.67
Panama$4.70
Monaco$4.80
Sweden$4.83
Taiwan$4.86
Singapore$4.90
Chile$4.95
Norway$5.08
United Kingdom$5.31
France$5.36
Luxembourg$5.51
Hong Kong/Macau$5.52
Finland$5.67
Denmark$6.55
Switzerland$7.17

The U.S. has the 21st-least expensive coffee in the world at $3.26 for a Tall Latte, making it an unusual combination of a high-income country with a low price. Usually, it’s more common to see countries with a “developing” or “low-to-middle income” status have cheaper Starbucks prices than higher-income countries.

The Price of a Tall Latte Relative to Income

However, simply converting local prices to USD doesn’t give the most accurate picture of how expensive Starbucks is in a country. Taking purchasing power into consideration, here’s how the price of a Tall Latte measures as a percentage of a country’s median daily income.

A bar chart showing the how much of a percentage of the daily median income would go into buying a Starbucks Tall Latte in the 10 most and least expensive countries.

In Cambodia and India, it would take more than 70% of the median daily wage to buy a Starbucks coffee. Other countries with relatively cheaper Tall Lattes in U.S. dollar terms include Indonesia, Morocco, and Bolivia—but these are still not the most affordable for local customers.

For a more broad-based view of Starbucks affordability, SavingSpot has also charted the price of a Tall Latte against each country’s per capita GDP. Countries placing higher than the trendline get relatively bad value at Starbucks, while those below the line can get more lattes with their average local paycheck.

Switzerland, Denmark and Luxembourg all have expensive Tall Lattes, even relative to their high-earning populations.

But countries like Chile, Panama, and Argentina have the worst of both worlds. Not only do they have more expensive lattes than higher GDP per capita countries like Canada, the U.S., and Australia, they do so at a fraction of the income.

What’s the Most Expensive Starbucks Item?

Based on SavingSpot’s findings, the Iced Caramel Macchiato in Switzerland is the most expensive Starbucks menu item in the world, coming in at a whopping $9.31 for a coffee with vanilla-flavored syrup and a caramel drizzle.

A graphic showing the 10 most expensive items at Starbucks. The Iced Caramel Macchiato in Switzerland costs $9.31.

Denmark, Luxembourg, and France also have items well above the $7 USD price tag.

Whether those prices justify the quality of Starbucks coffee is a question best left up to the coffee aficionados, but for Starbucks, it’s a strategy that’s certainly helping the company’s earnings.

Still have questions about coffee? Check out From Bean to Brew which breaks down the complicated coffee supply chain.
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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Maps

Mapped: 2024 Global Elections by Country

It’s election year around the world, and this map of 2024 global elections by country shows just how many people will be impacted.

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2024 global elections map

Mapping 2024 Global Elections by Country

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

With almost half of the world’s population residing in countries holding executive or legislative elections in 2024, it’s set to be the busiest election year ever recorded.

This visualization uses collated 2024 global elections data from our 2024 Global Forecast Series as well as from Time, while country populations are taken from Worldometer as of January 2024.

Countries Holding 2024 Elections Around the World

Many people are already aware of the U.S. presidential and legislative elections set to be held on November 5th, especially due to American influence on the global political stage and media coverage.

But two governments affecting larger populations, India and the European Union, are also slated to have elections in 2024.

Below, we sort the countries expected to hold elections in 2024 by population (countries with no set election date yet have been marked “N/A”):

CountryElection DateTypePopulation
🇮🇳 IndiaN/ALegislative1,428,627,663
🇪🇺 European Union6/6/2024Legislative448,387,872
🇺🇸 United States11/5/2024Executive & Legislative339,996,563
🇮🇩 Indonesia2/14/2024Executive & Legislative277,534,122
🇵🇰 Pakistan2/8/2024Legislative240,485,658
🇧🇩 Bangladesh1/7/2024Legislative172,954,319
🇷🇺 Russia3/15/2024Executive144,444,359
🇲🇽 Mexico6/2/2024Executive & Legislative128,455,567
🇮🇷 Iran3/1/2024Legislative89,172,767
🇬🇧 UKN/ALegislative67,736,802
🇿🇦 South Africa5/29/2024Legislative60,414,495
🇰🇷 South Korea4/10/2024Legislative51,784,059
🇩🇿 AlgeriaN/AExecutive45,606,480
🇺🇦 Ukraine3/31/2024Executive36,744,634
🇺🇿 UzbekistanN/ALegislative35,163,944
🇬🇭 Ghana12/7/2024Executive & Legislative34,121,985
🇲🇿 Mozambique10/9/2024Executive & Legislative33,897,354
🇲🇬 MadagascarN/ALegislative30,325,732
🇻🇪 VenezuelaN/AExecutive28,838,499
🇰🇵 North KoreaN/ALegislative26,160,821
🇹🇼 Taiwan1/13/2024Executive & Legislative23,923,276
🇲🇱 MaliN/AExecutive23,293,698
🇸🇾 SyriaN/ALegislative23,227,014
🇱🇰 Sri LankaN/AExecutive & Legislative21,893,579
🇷🇴 RomaniaN/AExecutive & Legislative19,892,812
🇹🇩 ChadN/AExecutive18,278,568
🇸🇳 Senegal12/15/2024Executive17,763,163
🇰🇭 Cambodia2/25/2024Legislative16,944,826
🇷🇼 Rwanda7/15/2024Executive & Legislative14,094,683
🇹🇳 TunisiaN/AExecutive12,458,223
🇧🇪 Belgium6/9/2024Legislative11,686,140
🇯🇴 JordanN/ALegislative11,337,052
🇩🇴 Dominican Republic5/19/2024Executive & Legislative11,332,972
🇸🇸 South SudanN/AExecutive & Legislative11,088,796
🇨🇿 CzechiaN/ALegislative10,495,295
🇦🇿 Azerbaijan2/7/2024Executive10,412,651
🇵🇹 Portugal3/10/2024Legislative10,247,605
🇧🇾 Belarus2/25/2024Legislative9,498,238
🇹🇬 Togo4/20/2024Legislative9,053,799
🇦🇹 AustriaN/ALegislative8,958,960
🇸🇻 El Salvador2/4/2024Executive & Legislative6,364,943
🇸🇰 Slovakia3/23/2024Executive5,795,199
🇫🇮 Finland1/28/2024Executive5,545,475
🇲🇷 Mauritania6/22/2024Executive4,862,989
🇵🇦 Panama5/5/2024Executive & Legislative4,468,087
🇭🇷 Croatia9/22/2024Executive & Legislative4,008,617
🇬🇪 Georgia10/26/2024Executive & Legislative3,728,282
🇲🇳 Mongolia6/28/2024Legislative3,447,157
🇲🇩 MoldovaN/AExecutive3,435,931
🇺🇾 Uruguay10/27/2024Executive & Legislative3,423,108
🇱🇹 Lithuania5/12/2024Executive & Legislative2,718,352
🇧🇼 BotswanaN/ALegislative2,675,352
🇳🇦 NamibiaN/AExecutive & Legislative2,604,172
🇬🇼 Guinea BissauN/AExecutive2,150,842
🇲🇰 North Macedonia5/8/2024Executive & Legislative2,085,679
🇲🇺 Mauritius11/30/2024Legislative1300557
🇰🇲 Comoros1/14/2024Executive852,075
🇧🇹 Bhutan1/9/2024Legislative787,424
🇸🇧 Solomon Islands4/17/2024Legislative740,424
🇲🇻 Maldives3/17/2024Legislative521,021
🇮🇸 Iceland6/1/2024Executive375,318
🇰🇮 KiribatiN/AExecutive & Legislative133,515
🇸🇲 San MarinoN/ALegislative33,642
🇵🇼 Palau11/12/2024Executive & Legislative18,058
🇹🇻 Tuvalu1/26/2024Legislative11,396

A few notable elections have already occurred. Taiwan held general elections on January 13th, with the more anti-China Democratic Progressive Party retaining the presidency but losing its majority in the legislature.

Pakistan also held elections on February 8th, with former Prime Minster Imran Khan’s party and affiliates winning a plurality of seats but losing power to a military-backed coalition.

Pakistan’s election results were cast into doubt by foreign observers and media, with Khan having been arrested and sentenced to prison on corruption charges. It is far from the only country holding controversial and potentially undemocratic elections in 2024.

Bangladesh’s landslide January 7th elections were boycotted by the opposition and voters, and Russia’s March 15th elections had three anti-war presidential candidates barred from competing, including Alexei Navalny before his controversial death in February.

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