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Mapped: The Ukraine Refugee Crisis in Europe

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Map of Ukrainian Refugee Crisis across Europe

Mapped: The Ukraine Refugee Crisis in Europe

The world has seen several refugee crises over the last decade, from conflicts in the Americas, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. However, over the last few months, another migrant crisis has emerged, and once again Europe has been the focus.

On February 24, 2022, Russia launched a full-scale military invasion of Ukraine. Since then, millions of Ukrainians have fled their homes in search of refuge, with a majority heading through neighboring countries like Poland, Romania, and Russia.

This map by Elbie Bentley uses immigration data from the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) as of May 24th, 2022 to visualize current migration crisis that’s happening across Europe. It shows where Ukrainian refugees crossed borders as they fled the conflict.

Refugee Border Crossings into Neighboring Countries

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, close to 6.6 million people have fled Ukraine to neighboring countries. Put another way, this is the largest refugee crisis in Europe since WWII.

Country# of Border Crossings (as May 24, 2022)
🇵🇱​ Poland3,505,890
🇷🇴​ Romania961,270
🇷🇺​ Russia919,934
🇭🇺​ Hungary644,474
🇲🇩​ Moldova471,223
🇸🇰​ Slovakia442,316
🇧🇾​ Belarus27,308

Data above is from Feb 24 to May 24, 2022. The situation is fluid, and we recommend visiting the data source linked above for the latest data.

Though the UNHCR tracks departures individually, it’s important to note that arrivals can include people who’ve crossed multiple borders after leaving Ukraine. For example, a refugee heading to Romania via Moldova may be counted twice in the dataset. For this reason, adding the individual country totals together results in a number higher than 6.6 million.

Poland has seen the highest number of Ukrainian refugees, with an estimated 3.5 million people crossing the border since February 24th. About a million of those refugees have been registered in Poland, and 94% of those registered refugees have been women and children.

Russia has received the third most refugees, with many of them coming from or near separatist regions in the east of Ukraine. Russia also says it helped evacuate 140,000 civilians from Mariupol, but claims that those populations were not forced to migrate to Russia.

Hungary has seen the fourth-largest influx of refugees, seeing 644,474 Ukrainians cross into the country since the start of the conflict. In recent years, the Hungarian government been in the headlines because of its views towards migrants, including in 2018, when Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orbán made controversial comments about Syrian refugees.

While the above countries are the entry points for refugees, it’s worth noting that many migrants ultimately make their way to many other places throughout Europe and the world. For example, Germany has accepted 780,000 Ukrainian refugees since the start of the war, despite not sharing a border directly with Ukraine.

An Internal Refugee Crisis

While many Ukrainians had fled the country, millions more have been displaced or trapped within.

As of the end of May, approximately 8 million Ukrainians have been forced to relocate, while approximately 13 million are either stranded in areas affected by the conflict or trapped because of things like increased security or infrastructure damage.

Ukraine and Russia are reeling from the war and its impact, and a ripple effect is hitting countries dependent on Ukrainian trade for agricultural and industrial goods and Russian oil and gas. Add the migrant crisis to the mix, and the total consequences will be felt for decades throughout the region.

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Maps

Mapped: Which Countries Recognize Israel or Palestine, or Both?

In this visualization, we look at how international recognition of Israel and Palestine breaks down among the 193 UN member states.

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Map showing the recognition of Israel and Palestine by the 193 UN member countries.

Which Countries Recognize Israel or Palestine, or Both?

The modern-day conflict between Israel and Palestine emerged from the British Mandate for Palestine, which administered the former Ottoman Empire territory after World War I. But even after 75 years—and declarations of independence from each side—universal recognition eludes them.

In this visualization, we look at how Israel and Palestine recognition breaks down among the 193 UN member states as of November 14, 2023, using Wikpedia data for each state.

This post is a companion piece to separate maps showing the recognition of Israel and of Palestine by country.

A Declaration of Independence

The Jewish People’s Council declared the foundation of the State of Israel on May 14, 1948 (the same day that the last British forces left Haifa) on the basis of the 1947 UN Partition Plan, which divided the Mandate territories between Jewish and Arab populations.

U.S. President Truman granted de-facto recognition 11 minutes after the Israeli declaration. Not to be outdone by their Cold War adversary, the U.S.S.R. followed suit three days later with de-jure recognition and was joined by Warsaw Pact allies Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and Poland.

By the end of 1948, 21 countries recognized Israel.

A Second Declaration of Independence

A declaration of independence for the State of Palestine, comprising the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, and East Jerusalem, didn’t happen until 40 years later.

In the midst of the First Intifada, a five-year-long Palestinian uprising that began in 1987, the Palestine Liberation Organization proclaimed the new state in the city of Algiers on November 15, 1988.

A dozen countries, including 10 members of the Arab League along with Malaysia and Yemen, immediately recognized the new state. The Soviet Union, the Eastern Bloc, and most of the Muslim world also joined in recognizing the State of Palestine.

Recognition of Israel and Palestine by Country

As of November 2023, 163 UN member states have recognized Israel, while 138 have recognized Palestine.

UN Member StateRecognize Israel 🇮🇱Recognize Palestine 🇵🇸
🇦🇫AfghanistanNoYes
🇦🇱AlbaniaYesYes
🇩🇿AlgeriaNoYes
🇦🇩AndorraYesNo
🇦🇴AngolaYesYes
🇦🇬Antigua and BarbudaYesYes
🇦🇷ArgentinaYesYes
🇦🇲ArmeniaYesNo
🇦🇺AustraliaYesNo
🇦🇹AustriaYesNo
🇦🇿AzerbaijanYesYes
🇧🇸BahamasYesNo
🇧🇭BahrainYesYes
🇧🇩BangladeshNoYes
🇧🇧BarbadosYesNo
🇧🇾BelarusYesYes
🇧🇪BelgiumYesNo
🇧🇿BelizeNoYes
🇧🇯BeninYesYes
🇧🇹BhutanYesYes
🇧🇴BoliviaNoYes
🇧🇦Bosnia and HerzegovinaYesYes
🇧🇼BotswanaYesYes
🇧🇷BrazilYesYes
🇧🇳BruneiNoYes
🇧🇬BulgariaYesYes
🇧🇫Burkina FasoYesYes
🇧🇮BurundiYesYes
🇰🇭CambodiaYesYes
🇨🇲CameroonYesNo
🇨🇦CanadaYesNo
🇨🇻Cape VerdeYesYes
🇨🇫Central African RepublicYesYes
🇹🇩ChadYesYes
🇨🇱ChileYesYes
🇨🇳ChinaYesYes
🇨🇴ColombiaYesYes
🇰🇲ComorosNoYes
🇨🇷Costa RicaYesYes
🇨🇮Côte d'IvoireYesYes
🇭🇷CroatiaYesNo
🇨🇺CubaNoYes
🇨🇾CyprusYesYes
🇨🇿CzechiaYesYes
🇨🇩Democratic Republic of the CongoYesYes
🇩🇰DenmarkYesNo
🇩🇯DjiboutiNoYes
🇩🇲DominicaYesYes
🇩🇴Dominican RepublicYesYes
🇪🇨EcuadorYesYes
🇪🇬EgyptYesYes
🇸🇻El SalvadorYesYes
🇬🇶Equatorial GuineaYesYes
🇪🇷EritreaYesNo
🇪🇪EstoniaYesNo
🇸🇿EswatiniYesYes
🇪🇹EthiopiaYesYes
🇫🇲Federated States of MicronesiaYesNo
🇫🇯FijiYesNo
🇫🇮FinlandYesNo
🇫🇷FranceYesNo
🇬🇦GabonYesYes
🇬🇪GeorgiaYesYes
🇩🇪GermanyYesNo
🇬🇭GhanaYesYes
🇬🇷GreeceYesNo
🇬🇩GrenadaYesYes
🇬🇹GuatemalaYesYes
🇬🇳GuineaYesYes
🇬🇼Guinea-BissauYesYes
🇬🇾GuyanaYesYes
🇭🇹HaitiYesYes
🇭🇳HondurasYesYes
🇭🇺HungaryYesYes
🇮🇸IcelandYesYes
🇮🇳IndiaYesYes
🇮🇩IndonesiaNoYes
🇮🇷IranNoYes
🇮🇶IraqNoYes
🇮🇪IrelandYesNo
🇮🇱IsraelYesNo
🇮🇹ItalyYesNo
🇯🇲JamaicaYesNo
🇯🇵JapanYesNo
🇯🇴JordanYesYes
🇰🇿KazakhstanYesYes
🇰🇪KenyaYesYes
🇰🇮KiribatiYesNo
🇰🇼KuwaitNoYes
🇰🇬KyrgyzstanYesYes
🇱🇦LaosYesYes
🇱🇻LatviaYesNo
🇱🇧LebanonNoYes
🇱🇸LesothoYesYes
🇱🇷LiberiaYesYes
🇱🇾LibyaNoYes
🇱🇮LiechtensteinYesNo
🇱🇹LithuaniaYesNo
🇱🇺LuxembourgYesNo
🇲🇬MadagascarYesYes
🇲🇼MalawiYesYes
🇲🇾MalaysiaNoYes
🇲🇻MaldivesNoYes
🇲🇱MaliNoYes
🇲🇹MaltaYesYes
🇲🇭Marshall IslandsYesNo
🇲🇷MauritaniaNoYes
🇲🇺MauritiusYesYes
🇲🇽MexicoYesNo
🇲🇩MoldovaYesNo
🇲🇨MonacoYesNo
🇲🇳MongoliaYesYes
🇲🇪MontenegroYesYes
🇲🇦MoroccoYesYes
🇲🇿MozambiqueYesYes
🇲🇲MyanmarYesNo
🇳🇦NamibiaYesYes
🇳🇷NauruYesNo
🇳🇵NepalYesYes
🇳🇱NetherlandsYesNo
🇳🇿New ZealandYesNo
🇳🇮NicaraguaYesYes
🇳🇪NigerNoYes
🇳🇬NigeriaYesYes
🇰🇵North KoreaNoYes
🇲🇰North MacedoniaYesNo
🇳🇴NorwayYesNo
🇴🇲OmanNoYes
🇵🇰PakistanNoYes
🇵🇼PalauYesNo
🇵🇦PanamaYesNo
🇵🇬Papua New GuineaYesYes
🇵🇾ParaguayYesYes
🇵🇪PeruYesYes
🇵🇭PhilippinesYesYes
🇵🇱PolandYesYes
🇵🇹PortugalYesNo
🇶🇦QatarNoYes
🇨🇬Republic of the CongoYesYes
🇷🇴RomaniaYesYes
🇷🇺RussiaYesYes
🇷🇼RwandaYesYes
🇰🇳Saint Kitts and NevisYesYes
🇱🇨Saint LuciaYesYes
🇻🇨Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesYesYes
🇼🇸SamoaYesNo
🇸🇲San MarinoYesNo
🇸🇹São Tomé and PríncipeYesYes
🇸🇦Saudi ArabiaNoYes
🇸🇳SenegalYesYes
🇷🇸SerbiaYesYes
🇸🇨SeychellesYesYes
🇸🇱Sierra LeoneYesYes
🇸🇬SingaporeYesNo
🇸🇰SlovakiaYesYes
🇸🇮SloveniaYesNo
🇸🇧Solomon IslandsYesNo
🇸🇴SomaliaNoYes
🇿🇦South AfricaYesYes
🇰🇷South KoreaYesNo
🇸🇸South SudanYesYes
🇪🇸SpainYesNo
🇱🇰Sri LankaYesYes
🇸🇩SudanYesYes
🇸🇷SurinameYesYes
🇸🇪SwedenYesYes
🇨🇭SwitzerlandYesNo
🇸🇾SyriaNoYes
🇹🇯TajikistanYesYes
🇹🇿TanzaniaYesYes
🇹🇭ThailandYesYes
🇬🇲The GambiaYesYes
🇹🇱Timor-LesteYesYes
🇹🇬TogoYesYes
🇹🇴TongaYesNo
🇹🇹Trinidad and TobagoYesNo
🇹🇳TunisiaNoYes
🇹🇷TürkiyeYesYes
🇹🇲TurkmenistanYesYes
🇹🇻TuvaluYesNo
🇺🇬UgandaYesYes
🇺🇦UkraineYesYes
🇦🇪United Arab EmiratesYesYes
🇬🇧United KingdomYesNo
🇺🇸United StatesYesNo
🇺🇾UruguayYesYes
🇺🇿UzbekistanYesYes
🇻🇺VanuatuYesYes
🇻🇪VenezuelaNoYes
🇻🇳VietnamYesYes
🇾🇪YemenNoYes
🇿🇲ZambiaYesYes
🇿🇼ZimbabweYesYes

Most of the countries that do not currently recognize Israel are Muslim-majority countries. However, some Muslim-majority countries have recognized Israel, such as Egypt and Jordan, who specifically agreed to do so under peace treaties signed in 1979 and 1994 respectively.

Several conflicts have also resulted in some countries suspending relations with Israel. The 1967 and 1973 Arab-Israeli Wars (also called the Six-Day War and Yom Kippur War, respectively) all saw countries suspend diplomatic relations, including Mali and the Maldives. In the case of Eastern Bloc countries that did so in 1967 and 1973, many resumed relations after the fall of the Soviet Union.

On the other side, despite more countries recognizing the State of Palestine over time, none of the G7 and only nine of the G20 have recognized the state. Similarly, only a minority of the EU has endorsed the declaration.

Present-Day

Israel and Palestine continue to vie for recognition in the international arena, with the former gaining recognition from a few countries including Bhutan and the UAE in 2020, and the latter from Colombia in 2018 and Saint Kitts and Nevis in 2019.

But universal recognition continues to elude both sides, with many countries awaiting a formal resolution to the conflict from the two sides.

It’s worth noting that both Israel and Palestine took steps towards recognition under the Oslo Accords, signed on September 13, 1993. The agreement saw Palestine recognize the State of Israel, put an end to the First Intifada, and allowed for limited self-government under a new Palestinian National Authority in Gaza and the West Bank. It promised to lay the groundwork for a two-state solution; a promise of peace that has yet to be realized.

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