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Chart: The End of World Poverty is in Sight

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The End of World Poverty is in Sight

End of World Poverty is in Sight

The number of people in extreme poverty has been cut in half since 1990.

The Chart of the Week is a weekly Visual Capitalist feature on Fridays.

The world is not a perfect place, and there are many injustices that still must be combatted. Just some of these include racism, sexism, income inequality, climate change, terrorism, soaring debt, corruption, and food and water security.

Many groups of people have it rough, and they deservedly have an axe to grind. There’s plenty of work to still be done.

However, sometimes we get so caught up in our day-to-day battles and the negative news stories that we forget to look at the big picture – and the big picture actually provides a lot of optimism.

Despite the majority of Americans being pessimistic about the future, the world is actually getting better as a whole: people are living longer and healthier lives, crime and violence are down, and living standards are generally improving.

Could an End to World Poverty be near?

One particular area that is fascinating to look at is poverty.

In absolute terms, the total amount of people living in extreme poverty peaked in 1970 when 2.2 billion of the world’s 3.7 billion people lived on less than $1.25 per day.

Today, in an astonishing reversal, only 0.7 billion of 7.3 billion people are below this poverty-line worldwide.

While progress has been made in many countries, the story of China is of particular interest: after market reforms started being introduced in 1978, the country grew at an average pace of 10% per year until 2010. Over this period of time, at least 800 million people were lifted out of absolute poverty.

And while there is still much work to be done, this is an undeniable step in the right direction. The U.N. even has a bold target to end extreme world poverty by 2030.

Based on the progress so far, this doesn’t seem unrealistic.

Contributing Factors

Why have we made so much progress in this realm?

One of the most important factors is very simple: it’s estimated that two-thirds of poverty reduction comes from good old-fashioned economic growth. For every 1% increase in GDP per head, poverty is reduced by 1.7%.

From 1960 to 2000, developing nations grew at an average pace of 4.3% – and from 2000 to 2010, they grew at an even faster pace of 6.0% per year. This helped lift a lot of people out of extreme poverty.

The other factor for the remaining one-third? It’s income distribution. The degree to which economic growth helps the poorest depends on their chances of getting some of that benefit.

It’s estimated that a 1% increase in GDP per head in the least equal countries only reduces poverty by 0.6%, while it does so by 4.3% in the most equal of places.

More growth and more equality will make it possible for this powerful trend in poverty reduction to continue. And by 2030 – who knows – maybe extreme levels of poverty will be an afterthought for society.

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The Richest People in the World in 2024

The combined wealth of the 10 richest individuals in the world amounts to $1.44 trillion.

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A list of the richest people in the world in 2024.

The Richest People in the World in 2024

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The combined wealth of the 10 richest individuals in the world amounts to $1.44 trillion.

Using data from Forbes Real-Time Billionaires List, we provide a snapshot of the richest people in the world as of February 2024.

Bernard Arnault Ahead of Elon Musk

Bernard Arnault overtook Elon Musk as the richest person in 2024 due to a 21% decline in Musk’s wealth, from $245.3 billion to $194.6 billion.

The billionaire chairman and CEO of the global luxury goods company LVMH runs dozens of luxury brands such as Louis Vuitton, Sephora, and Tiffany & Co. The French businessman also has investments in businesses such as Netflix and ByteDance, the parent company of TikTok.

RankNameNet WorthSourceCountry
1Bernard Arnault & family$212.1BLVMH🇫🇷 France
2Elon Musk$194.6BTesla, SpaceX🇺🇸 United States
3Jeff Bezos$192.4BAmazon🇺🇸 United States
4Mark Zuckerberg$161.8BFacebook🇺🇸 United States
5Larry Ellison$144.0BOracle🇺🇸 United States
6Warren Buffett$128.7BBerkshire Hathaway🇺🇸 United States
7Bill Gates$123.1BMicrosoft🇺🇸 United States
8Larry Page$120.3BGoogle🇺🇸 United States
9Steve Ballmer$119.2BMicrosoft🇺🇸 United States
10Sergey Brin$115.4BGoogle🇺🇸 United States

The cumulative net worth of the top five richest individuals grew 4% in 2023, to $904.9 billion.

Among women, the richest person, L’Oréal’s Françoise Bettencourt Meyers, saw her fortune grow by $1.2 billion in 2023.

In China, Zhong Shanshan, the chairman and founder of bottled water and beverage producer Nongfu Spring, remains the country’s richest person with a net worth of $60.5 billion.

In India, the list is topped by Mukesh Ambani. The chairman of Reliance Industries, which has interests in petrochemicals, oil and gas, telecom, retail, and financial services, has a $102.1 billion fortune.

How Fortunes Have Changed

Just as in 2023, Mark Zuckerberg saw the most significant growth in his fortune among the top 10 richest individuals. The Facebook co-founder’s net worth surged by over $45 billion by February 2024 compared to November 2023, after Meta’s latest results far exceeded Wall Street’s expectations, sending its shares up.

Zuckerberg’s net worth growth of 39% moved him from 7th to 4th, overtaking Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Larry Ellison.

A list of the top 10 richest people in the world in 2024.

Meanwhile, Larry Ellison, Oracle’s chief technology officer and former CEO, saw his net worth retreat by $3 billion after the company reported disappointing revenue in 2023.

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