Mapped: The Best-Selling Vehicles in the World by Country
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The Best-Selling Vehicles in the World By Country

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Map Best-Selling Vehicles in the World 1200

The Best-Selling Vehicles in the World By Country

Each country has different preferences for goods, and vehicles are no different.

Consumers in a dense country might prefer smaller cars, while countries with wide expanses (and parking spots) open the way for larger trucks. Likewise, rugged terrain might call for vehicles that can adapt and scale quickly.

And it’s also a question of which manufacturer invested in the country. As the world’s largest automakers have raced to attract consumers in every corner of the globe, they built factories, renamed models, and even built specific cars to fit the tastes of individual countries.

This infographic from Budget Direct Car Insurance highlights the best-selling vehicles in the world, using 2019 year-end sales data.

What is the Most Popular Vehicle in Each Country?

Though the map might vary across the board, one thing is certain: Toyota’s dominance.

The Japanese automaker—which was also the most valuable automaker in the world for many years before being overtaken by Tesla—had the best-selling vehicle in 41 countries of the 104 countries tallied.

It also had the world’s best-selling vehicle in 2019, the Toyota Corolla, though the sedan only took the top spot itself in five countries.

CountryBest-Selling VehicleType
AlgeriaDacia SanderoSubcompact
American SamoaToyota TacomaTruck
AngolaToyota Land Cruiser J70SUV
ArgentinaToyota HiluxTruck
AustraliaToyota HiluxTruck
AustriaSkoda OctaviaSedan
AzerbaijanKhazar SD/LDSedan
BahrainToyota Land CruiserSUV
BelarusLada VestaSedan
BelgiumVW GolfHatchback
Bosnia and HerzegovinaSkoda OctaviaSedan
BotswanaToyota HiluxTruck
BrazilChevrolet OnixSubcompact
CanadaFord F-SeriesTruck
ChileMitsubishi L-200Truck
ChinaVW LavidaSedan
ColombiaRenault SanderoSubcompact
Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast)Toyota HiluxTruck
CroatiaSkoda OctaviaSedan
CyprusToyota YarisSubcompact
Czech RepublicSkoda OctaviaSedan
DenmarkNissan QashqaiSUV
EcuadorChevrolet SparkSubcompact
EgyptChevrolet T-SeriesTruck
EstoniaToyota Rav4SUV
FijiToyota HiluxTruck
FinlandSkoda OctaviaSedan
FrancePeugeot 208 ISubcompact
GeorgiaRenault/Dacia DusterSUV
GermanyVW GolfHatchback
GreeceToyota YarisSubcompact
HungarySuzuki VitaraSUV
IcelandToyota Rav4SUV
IndiaMaruti AltoHatchback
IndonesiaToyota AvanzaVan
IranSaipa PrideSedan
IraqKia FrontierTruck
IrelandToyota CorollaSedan
IsraelToyota CorollaSedan
ItalyFiat PandaSubcompact
JapanHonda N-BOXSubcompact
JordanHyundai TucsonSUV
KazakhstanToyota CamrySedan
KenyaToyota HiluxTruck
KosovoDacia SanderoSubcompact
KuwaitToyota Land CruiserSUV
LatviaToyota CorollaSedan
LebanonToyota Land CruiserSUV
LesothoToyota HiluxTruck
LiechtensteinVW GolfHatchback
LithuaniaFiat 500Subcompact
LuxembourgVW GolfHatchback
MacedoniaKia SportageSUV
MalawiToyota HiluxTruck
MalaysiaPerodua MyviHatchback
MexicoNissan VersaSedan
MoldovaDacia LoganSedan
MonacoSmart FortwoSubcompact
MoroccoDacia DokkerVan
NamibiaToyota HiluxTruck
NetherlandsTesla Model 3Sedan
New ZealandFord RangerTruck
NorwayTesla Model 3Sedan
OmanToyota Land CruiserSUV
PakistanToyota CorollaSedan
PanamaToyota HiluxTruck
Papua New GuineaToyota Land Cruiser J70SUV
ParaguayChevrolet OnixSubcompact
PeruToyota HiluxTruck
PhilippinesToyota ViosSubcompact
PolandSkoda OctaviaSedan
PortugalRenault ClioHatchback
QatarToyota Land CruiserSUV
RomaniaDacia LoganSedan
RussiaLada GrantaSubcompact
SamoaToyota HiaceVan
Saudi ArabiaHyundai AccentSubcompact
SenegalMitsubishi L200Truck
SerbiaSkoda OctaviaSedan
SingaporeHonda Vezel/HR-VSUV
SlovakiaSkoda FabiaSubcompact
SloveniaRenault ClioHatchback
Solomon IslandsToyota HiluxTruck
South AfricaToyota HiluxTruck
South KoreaHyundai GrandeurSedan
SpainSEAT LeonHatchback
Sri LankaSuzuki AltoHatchback
Swaziland (Eswatini)Toyota HiluxTruck
SwedenVolvo S/V60Sedan/Wagon
SwitzerlandSkoda OctaviaSedan
SyriaHyundai TucsonSUV
TaiwanToyota CorollaSedan
ThailandToyota HiluxTruck
TongaToyota HiluxTruck
TunisiaRenault ClioHatchback
TurkeyFiat EgeaSedan
UkraineKia SportageSUV
United Arab EmiratesToyota Land CruiserSUV
United KingdomFord FiestaSubcompact
United StatesFord F-150Truck
UruguayRenault KwidHatchback
VenezuelaToyota FortunerSUV
VietnamToyota ViosSubcompact
YemenToyota Land CruiserSUV

As the best-seller in 16 countries, the Toyota Hilux truck (also known as the Toyota Pickup in North America) was the top vehicle in the most countries. It has a noticeably strong market share in the Southern Hemisphere, including in Argentina, South Africa, and Australia.

The other consistent factor was the strength of local manufacturers. Many countries with large automakers had local models as the best-selling vehicles, especially in Europe.

Country with Local Best-SellerVehicle
Czech RepublicŠkoda Octavia
FrancePeugeot 208 I
GermanyVW Golf
IndiaMaruti Alto
IranSAIPA Pride
ItalyFiat Panda
JapanHonda N-BOX
MalaysiaPerodua Myvi
RomaniaDacia Logan
RussiaLada Granta
South KoreaHyundai Grandeur
SpainSEAT León
SwedenVolvo S/V60
U.S.Ford F-150

Cars are the Best-Selling Vehicles in the World

So what do car consumers currently prefer? Currently, cars have a slight edge over trucks as the best-selling vehicles in the world.

Of the 104 countries with sales tallied for the study, smaller cars often classified as “passenger vehicles” (including sedans, hatchbacks, and subcompacts) made up the majority of best-sellers, with 57 of the best-selling vehicles by country.

Meanwhile, “light trucks” or “light commercial vehicles,” which include trucks, SUVs, and vans, were best-sellers in 47 countries.

Best-Selling Vehicles by Type

  • Hatchback: 12
  • Sedan: 25
  • Sedan/Wagon: 1
  • Subcompact: 19
  • SUV: 20
  • Truck: 24
  • Van: 3

But changing car consumption preferences are already making their mark. The electric vehicle (EV) Tesla Model 3 was already the best-selling vehicle in both the Netherlands and Norway, and other countries like China are increasing incentives for consumers to purchase EVs.

That’s not even factoring in the slowdown of travel during the COVID pandemic, more workers going remote, and the semiconductor strain on automakers. A truly post-COVID world will likely transform the map even further.

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Energy

Visualizing the Range of Electric Cars vs. Gas-Powered Cars

With range anxiety being a barrier to EV adoption, how far can an electric car go on one charge, and how do EV ranges compare with gas cars?

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The Range of Electric Cars vs. Gas-Powered Cars

This was originally posted on Elements. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on natural resource megatrends in your email every week.

EV adoption has grown rapidly in recent years, but many prospective buyers still have doubts about electric car ranges.

In fact, 33% of new car buyers chose range anxiety—the concern about how far an EV can drive on a full charge—as their top inhibitor to purchasing electric cars in a survey conducted by EY.

So, how far can the average electric car go on one charge, and how does that compare with the typical range of gas-powered cars?

The Rise in EV Ranges

Thanks to improvements in battery technology, the average range of electric cars has more than doubled over the last decade, according to data from the International Energy Agency (IEA).

YearAvg. EV RangeMaximum EV Range
201079 miles (127 km)N/A
201186 miles (138 km)94 miles (151 km)
201299 miles (159 km)265 miles (426 km)
2013117 miles (188 km)265 miles (426 km)
2014130 miles (209 km)265 miles (426 km)
2015131 miles (211 km)270 miles (435 km)
2016145 miles (233 km)315 miles (507 km)
2017151 miles (243 km)335 miles (539 km)
2018189 miles (304 km)335 miles (539 km)
2019209 miles (336 km)370 miles (595 km)
2020210 miles (338 km)402 miles (647 km)
2021217 miles (349 km)520 miles* (837 km)

*Max range for EVs offered in the United States.
Source: IEA, U.S. DOE

As of 2021, the average battery-powered EV could travel 217 miles (349 km) on a single charge. It represents a 44% increase from 151 miles (243 km) in 2017 and a 152% increase relative to a decade ago.

Despite the steady growth, EVs still fall short when compared to gas-powered cars. For example, in 2021, the median gas car range (on one full tank) in the U.S. was around 413 miles (664 km)—nearly double what the average EV would cover.

As automakers roll out new models, electric car ranges are likely to continue increasing and could soon match those of their gas-powered counterparts. It’s important to note that EV ranges can change depending on external conditions.

What Affects EV Ranges?

In theory, EV ranges depend on battery capacity and motor efficiency, but real-world results can vary based on several factors:

  • Weather: At temperatures below 20℉ (-6.7℃), EVs can lose around 12% of their range, rising to 41% if heating is turned on inside the vehicle.
  • Operating Conditions: Thanks to regenerative braking, EVs may extend their maximum range during city driving.
  • Speed: When driving at high speeds, EV motors spin faster at a less efficient rate. This may result in range loss.

On the contrary, when driven at optimal temperatures of about 70℉ (21.5℃), EVs can exceed their rated range, according to an analysis by Geotab.

The 10 Longest-Range Electric Cars in America

Here are the 10 longest-range electric cars available in the U.S. as of 2022, based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) range estimates:

CarRange On One Full ChargeEstimated Base Price
Lucid Air520 miles (837 km)$170,500
Tesla Model S405 miles (652 km)$106,190
Tesla Model 3358 miles (576 km)$59,440
Mercedes EQS350 miles (563 km)$103,360
Tesla Model X348 miles (560 km)$122,440
Tesla Model Y330 miles (531 km)$67,440
Hummer EV329 miles (529 km)$110,295
BMW iX324 miles (521 km)$84,195
Ford F-150 Lightning320 miles (515 km)$74,169
Rivian R1S316 miles (509 km)$70,000

Source: Car and Driver

The top-spec Lucid Air offers the highest range of any EV with a price tag of $170,500, followed by the Tesla Model S. But the Tesla Model 3 offers the most bang for your buck if range and price are the only two factors in consideration.

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Misc

Brand Loyalty is Declining for Most Luxury Automakers

Brand loyalty has declined for most luxury automakers, but three brands—Tesla, Maserati, and Genesis—appear to have bucked the trend.

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Brand Loyalty is Declining for Most Luxury Automakers

New research conducted by S&P Global Mobility has found that brand loyalty—measured as the percentage of buyers that go back to the same brand for their next vehicle—is falling across the luxury segment.

In this infographic, we’ve visualized the results of this research, which spans from January 2020 to April 2022.

Brand Loyalty Losers

The following brands have all experienced a drop in brand loyalty over the time period.

For additional context, we’ve also included each brand’s score in the J.D. Power 2022 Initial Quality Study. This is measured based on the number of problems experienced per 100 vehicles (PP100) in the first 90 days of ownership.

BrandPercentage Point Change
in Brand Loyalty
PP100
🇬🇧 Land Rover-9.2193
🇩🇪 Porsche-8.5200
🇺🇸 Lincoln-7.9167
🇩🇪 Audi-7.3239
🇩🇪 Mercedes-Benz-7.0189
🇮🇹 Alfa Romeo-6.6211
🇺🇸 Cadillac-6.4163
🇸🇪 Volvo-5.3256
🇯🇵 Infiniti-5.2204
🇬🇧 Jaguar-5.1210
🇯🇵 Lexus-4.8157
Luxury average-4.5199
🇯🇵 Acura-2.7192
🇩🇪 BMW-2.3165

Land Rover experienced the biggest drop in loyalty, despite a better than average PP100 rating. One potential reason is timing⁠—the brand’s premier model, the Range Rover, has been in its fourth generation since 2012. The SUV has become relatively dated, though a new fifth generation was recently revealed for the 2022 model year.

Two Volkswagen Group brands, Audi and Porsche, also fared poorly in terms of loyalty. This is somewhat surprising, as both brands offer a portfolio of both gasoline and electric models. Many competitors, such as Acura, Lexus, and Maserati, have yet to release an EV.

Brand Loyalty Winners

Three brands have managed to buck the trend, as shown below.

BrandPercentage Point Change
in Brand Loyalty
PP100
Luxury average-4.5199
🇺🇸 Tesla+4.0226
🇮🇹 Maserati+4.3255
🇰🇷 Genesis+8.5156

We can draw parallels between Tesla and Apple, in that both have incredibly loyal followers.

For instance, between March 2021 to April 2022, 62% of buyers/households who returned to market and previously owned a Model 3 purchased a new Tesla. That’s an impressive statistic, especially when we consider Tesla’s history of build quality issues.

Maserati appears to be in the same boat. The Italian automaker has strengthened its brand loyalty by 4.3 percentage points, despite having the luxury segment’s worst PP100. Perhaps build quality matters less than we think.

Another Factor to Consider

Ongoing supply chain issues could also be contributing to wide-spread declines in loyalty. Rather than waiting several months (or in the case of EVs, years), buyers may switch to a different brand that has cars in stock.

We are still monitoring it week to week, but up to now basically worldwide, we had no issues running production.
– Joerg Burzer, Mercedes-Benz

Many automakers have reported that their supply issues are diminishing, though new economic challenges have risen. For example, surging inflation has pushed the price of a new car to record highs. Combined with rising interest rates (cost of borrowing), this could negatively impact the demand for new cars.

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