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Animation: The World’s Population in 2100 by Region

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It’s a well-known fact that 60% of the world’s population lives in Asia.

Although this information isn’t necessarily new or surprising to anyone, it’s still something that we’ve found interesting ways to look at in the past. For example, last week we showed you a data visualization using bubbles to represent the populations of every country in the world, and it really helped in putting these incredible demographics into perspective.

But here’s another look at population data – and this time we think it’ll provide more surprises. The following animated chart is based on data and projections from the U.N. Population Division, and it shows the evolving population share by region between 1950 and 2100.

Visualizing Population by Region

Today’s visualization comes from German geographer Simon Kuestenmacher, who posted the following animated graph:

The World's Population Sorted by Region

By 2100, only 11% of the world’s population will live in Northern America (United States and Canada), Europe, or Oceania.

Meanwhile, the vast majority of population growth will happen in Africa, a continent we noted earlier this week as being ripe in future economic opportunity, especially with its blossoming tech startup ecosystem.

Africa currently holds 16% of the world’s population, but by 2100 it will hold nearly the same percentage as Asia. Specifically, the U.N. Population Division expects Africa to hold 4.4 billion people by 2100, good for 39% of the world’s total.

Here are the projected tallies (in millions of people) by the U.N. for each region in 2015, 2030, 2050, and 2100:

Region2015203020502100
Africa1,1861,6792,4784,387
Asia4,3934,9235,2674,889
Europe738734707646
Northern America358396433500
Latin America / Caribbean634721784721
Oceania39475771
World7,3498,5019,72511,213

It should be noted that the U.N. classifies Northern America as Canada and the United States, while Mexico is included in the Latin America and Caribbean category. Lastly, the above table is based on revised projections from the U.N., which appears to be slightly different than the data set used in the chart.

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Mapped: The World’s Least Affordable Housing Markets in 2024

See which housing markets are considered ‘impossibly unaffordable’ according to their median price-to-income ratio.

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The World’s Least Affordable Housing Markets in 2024

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Many cities around the world have become very expensive to buy a home in, but which ones are the absolute most unattainable?

In this graphic, we highlight a number of housing markets that are deemed to be “impossibly unaffordable” in 2024, ranked by their median price-to-income ratio.

This data comes from the Demographia International Housing Affordability Report, which is produced by the Chapman University Center for Demographics and Policy.

Data and Key Takeaway

The median price-to-income ratio compares median house price to median household income within each market. A higher ratio (higher prices relative to incomes) means a city is less affordable.

See the following table for all of the data we used to create this graphic. Note that this analysis covers 94 markets across eight countries: Australia, Canada, China, Ireland, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

RankMetropolitan MarketCountryMedian price-to-income
ratio
1Hong Kong (SAR)🇨🇳 China16.7
2Sydney🇦🇺 Australia13.8
3Vancouver🇨🇦 Canada12.3
4San Jose🇺🇸 U.S.11.9
5Los Angeles🇺🇸 U.S.10.9
6Honolulu🇺🇸 U.S.10.5
7Melbourne🇦🇺 Australia9.8
8San Francisco🇺🇸 U.S.9.7
9Adelaide🇦🇺 Australia9.7
10San Diego🇺🇸 U.S.9.5
11Toronto🇨🇦 Canada9.3
12Auckland🇳🇿 New Zealand8.2

According to the Demographia report, cities with a median price-to-income ratio of over 9.0 are considered “impossibly unaffordable”.

We can see that the top city in this ranking, Hong Kong, has a ratio of 16.7. This means that the median price of a home is 16.7 times greater than the median income.

Which Cities are More Affordable?

On the flipside, here are the top 12 most affordable cities that were analyzed in the Demographia report.

RankMetropolitan MarketCountryMedian price-to-income
ratio
1Pittsburgh🇺🇸 U.S.3.1
2Rochester🇺🇸 U.S.3.4
2St. Louis🇺🇸 U.S.3.4
4Cleveland🇺🇸 U.S.3.5
5Edmonton🇨🇦 Canada3.6
5Buffalo🇺🇸 U.S.3.6
5Detroit🇺🇸 U.S.3.6
5Oklahoma City🇺🇸 U.S.3.6
9Cincinnati🇺🇸 U.S.3.7
9Louisville🇺🇸 U.S.3.7
11Singapore🇸🇬 Singapore3.8
12Blackpool & Lancashire🇬🇧 U.K.3.9

Cities with a median price-to-income ratio of less than 3.0 are considered “affordable”, while those between 3.1 and 4.0 are considered “moderately unaffordable”.

See More Real Estate Content From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoyed this post, be sure to check out Ranked: The Most Valuable Housing Markets in America.

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