Infographic: The Amazonification of Healthcare
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The Amazonification of Healthcare

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Navigating Transformative Forces in HealthcareHow Big Data Will Unlock the Potential of HealthcareHow Tech is Changing How Healthcare Must Communicate With PatientsThe Amazonification of HealthcareHow Artificial Intelligence is Transforming Clinical Trial RecruitmentEHR as a GPS for HealthcareMillennial Doctors Transforming Medicine

The Amazonification of Healthcare

The Amazonification of Healthcare

The digital age is no longer about just the product – it’s equally about the customer experience.

In turn, businesses are competing on their ability to deliver quantifiable results to empowered consumers, who are:

  • Informed
  • Proactive
  • Demanding
  • Discerning
  • Cost-conscious

Naturally, empowered consumers have high expectations of the services and brands they choose to integrate into their lives – and Amazon’s buying experience, which is ultra-fast, convenient, innovative, and driven by user reviews, is the perfect example of this trend in action.

This “Amazonification effect” is transforming every industry from retail to finance – and the healthcare industry is now set to change forever for both consumers and businesses.

Dreams of Amazonification

Today’s infographic comes to us from Publicis Health, and it shows the shift occurring in the healthcare space to a new outcome-based economy that is powered by an increasingly digital and data-driven experience.

It’s also led by the millennial generation, a group that is seeing buying power finally line up with their influence. These digital natives see no reason for the healthcare experience to be stuck in its old ways – they demand a fast, digital, convenient, and quantified version of healthcare along with ongoing relationships.

The ideal healthcare experience for this group looks something like this:

Convenient access
59% of U.S. healthcare consumers want their digital healthcare experience to mirror retail.

Digital channels
74% of millennial patients value the ability to book appointments and pay bills online.

Ongoing relationship
48% of healthcare consumers want to partner with their healthcare providers for personalized treatment.

Treating patients more like retail consumers will be a paradigm shift for healthcare – and it will require companies to invest in areas like big data to complete the patient experience.

An Ongoing Relationship

The patient-healthcare provider relationship is ever-changing.

As consumer demands grow, there is also an increased pressure on healthcare providers and pharma businesses to deliver. Patients no longer accept being told what they need, instead wanting to take more control of their health.

A more connected relationship with their healthcare provider can help achieve this goal. It’s made up of four components:

  1. Identify patient needs
  2. Uncover evolving needs by employing self-reporting to understand patterns of change
  3. Meet patient needs by enabling connected services for predictive interventions
  4. Match real life experience to treatment decisions, by using data to get a 360-degree of the patient

This can lead not only to a better patient care experience, but also better outcomes.

The Supportive Care Trifecta

An effective supportive care platform simplifies the many moving pieces that must come together in the patient care process. It leverages the following trifecta:

1. Service design
Connects services and workflows for optimal end-to-end experience, while also giving patients with the resources to engage with their own healthcare.

2. Technology activation
Backbone for delivering patient care to each stakeholder that is supported by artificial intelligence (AI) technology for a seamless experience.

3. Data intelligence
Right dashboards contribute to unearth analytic insights, revealing unique patient stories for strategic, tailored treatment.

Connecting humans with health systems, a supportive care platform links all players and workflows involved. The result? Quantifiable outcomes, and a clear return on investment.

Adopting big data in healthcare can yield:

  • 20%-30% in cost savings
  • 35% rise in patient access
  • 20% improvement in outcomes
  • 30% growth in revenue

Why it Matters

The supportive care platform drives business value by aligning collective commitments of key players in the healthcare industry.

StakeholderValue Outcomes
Patient- Improved awareness
- Better engagement
- Personalized experience
- Increased survival rates
- Better quality of life
Healthcare providers- Better delivery
- Improved efficiency
- Improved efficacy
- Reduced hospitalization rates
- More efficient, successful treatment
- Increased use of resources
Pharma- Leading customer and patient insight
- Improved customer and patient credibility
- Improved adherence
- Detailed understanding of patients

The evolving needs of healthcare consumers call for building long-term relationships between patients and healthcare providers.

With the disruptive solution of an intelligence-powered care system, pharma companies can further these ongoing relationships and advance both patient and business outcomes.

This is part four of a seven part series. Stay tuned by subscribing to Visual Capitalist for free, as we go into these six forces in more detail in the future.

Navigating Transformative Forces in HealthcareHow Big Data Will Unlock the Potential of HealthcareHow Tech is Changing How Healthcare Must Communicate With PatientsThe Amazonification of HealthcareHow Artificial Intelligence is Transforming Clinical Trial RecruitmentEHR as a GPS for HealthcareMillennial Doctors Transforming Medicine
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Science

Visualizing the Relationship Between Cancer and Lifespan

New research links mutation rates and lifespan. We visualize the data supporting this new framework for understanding cancer.

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Cancer and lifespan

A Newfound Link Between Cancer and Aging?

A new study in 2022 reveals a thought-provoking relationship between how long animals live and how quickly their genetic codes mutate.

Cancer is a product of time and mutations, and so researchers investigated its onset and impact within 16 unique mammals. A new perspective on DNA mutation broadens our understanding of aging and cancer development—and how we might be able to control it.

Mutations, Aging, and Cancer: A Primer

Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of cells. It is not a pathogen that infects the body, but a normal body process gone wrong.

Cells divide and multiply in our bodies all the time. Sometimes, during DNA replication, tiny mistakes (called mutations) appear randomly within the genetic code. Our bodies have mechanisms to correct these errors, and for much of our youth we remain strong and healthy as a result of these corrective measures.

However, these protections weaken as we age. Developing cancer becomes more likely as mutations slip past our defenses and continue to multiply. The longer we live, the more mutations we carry, and the likelihood of them manifesting into cancer increases.

A Biological Conundrum

Since mutations can occur randomly, biologists expect larger lifeforms (those with more cells) to have greater chances of developing cancer than smaller lifeforms.

Strangely, no association exists.

It is one of biology’s biggest mysteries as to why massive creatures like whales or elephants rarely seem to experience cancer. This is called Peto’s Paradox. Even stranger: some smaller creatures, like the naked mole rat, are completely resistant to cancer.

This phenomenon motivates researchers to look into the genetics of naked mole rats and whales. And while we’ve discovered that special genetic bonuses (like extra tumor-suppressing genes) benefit these creatures, a pattern for cancer rates across all other species is still poorly understood.

Cancer May Be Closely Associated with Lifespan

Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute report the first study to look at how mutation rates compare with animal lifespans.

Mutation rates are simply the speed at which species beget mutations. Mammals with shorter lifespans have average mutation rates that are very fast. A mouse undergoes nearly 800 mutations in each of its four short years on Earth. Mammals with longer lifespans have average mutation rates that are much slower. In humans (average lifespan of roughly 84 years), it comes to fewer than 50 mutations per year.

The study also compares the number of mutations at time of death with other traits, like body mass and lifespan. For example, a giraffe has roughly 40,000 times more cells than a mouse. Or a human lives 90 times longer than a mouse. What surprised researchers was that the number of mutations at time of death differed only by a factor of three.

Such small differentiation suggests there may be a total number of mutations a species can collect before it dies. Since the mammals reached this number at different speeds, finding ways to control the rate of mutations may help stall cancer development, set back aging, and prolong life.

The Future of Cancer Research

The findings in this study ignite new questions for understanding cancer.

Confirming that mutation rate and lifespan are strongly correlated needs comparison to lifeforms beyond mammals, like fishes, birds, and even plants.

It will also be necessary to understand what factors control mutation rates. The answer to this likely lies within the complexities of DNA. Geneticists and oncologists are continuing to investigate genetic curiosities like tumor-suppressing genes and how they might impact mutation rates.

Aging is likely to be a confluence of many issues, like epigenetic changes or telomere shortening, but if mutations are involved then there may be hopes of slowing genetic damage—or even reversing it.

While just a first step, linking mutation rates to lifespan is a reframing of our understanding of cancer development, and it may open doors to new strategies and therapies for treating cancer or taming the number of health-related concerns that come with aging.

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Misc

Explainer: What to Know About Monkeypox

What is monkeypox, and what risk does it pose to the public? This infographic breaks down the symptoms, transmission, and more.

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Explainer: What to Know About Monkeypox

The COVID-19 pandemic is still fresh in the minds of the people around the world, so it comes as no surprise that recent outbreaks of another virus are grabbing headlines.

Monkeypox outbreaks have now been reported in multiple countries, and it has scientists paying close attention. For everyone else, numerous questions come to the surface:

  • How serious is this virus?
  • How contagious is it?
  • Could monkeypox develop into a new pandemic?

Below, we answer these questions and more.

What is Monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a virus in the Orthopoxvirus genus which also includes the variola virus (which causes smallpox) and the cowpox virus. The primary symptoms include fever, swollen lymph nodes, and a distinctive bumpy rash.

There are two major strains of the virus that pose very different risks:

  • Congo Basin strain: 1 in 10 people infected with this strain have died
  • West African strain: Approximately 1 in 100 people infected with this strain died

At the moment, health authorities in the UK have indicated they’re seeing the milder strain in patients there.

Where did Monkeypox Originate From?

The virus was originally discovered in the Democratic Republic of Congo in monkeys kept for research purposes (hence the name). Eventually, the virus made the jump to humans more than a decade after its discovery in 1958.

It is widely assumed that vaccination against another similar virus, smallpox, helped keep monkeypox outbreaks from occurring in human populations. Ironically, the successful eradication of smallpox, and eventual winding down of that vaccine program, has opened the door to a new viral threat. There is now a growing population of people who no longer have immunity against the virus.

Now that travel restrictions are lifting in many parts of the world, viruses are now able to hop between nations again. As of the publishing of this article, a handful of cases have now been reported in the U.S., Canada, the UK, and a number of European countries.

On the upside, contact tracing has helped authorities piece together the transmission of the virus. While cases are rare in Europe and North America, it is considered endemic in parts of West Africa. For example, the World Health Organization reports that Nigeria has experienced over 550 reported monkeypox cases from 2017 to today. The current UK outbreak originated from an individual who returned from a trip to Nigeria.

Could Monkeypox become a new pandemic?

Monkeypox, which primarily spreads through animal-to-human interaction, is not known to spread easily between humans. Most individuals infected with monkeypox pass the virus to between zero and one person, so outbreaks typically fizzle out. For this reason, the fact that outbreaks are occurring in several countries simultaneously is concerning for health authorities and organizations that monitor viral transmission. Experts are entertaining the possibility that the virus’ rate of transmission has increased.

Images of people covered in monkeypox lesions are shocking, and people are understandably concerned by this virus, but the good news is that members of the general public have little to fear at this stage.

I think the risk to the general public at this point, from the information we have, is very, very low.
–Tom Inglesby, Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

» For up-to-date information on monkeypox cases, check out Global.Health’s tracking spreadsheet

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