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The Advertising Revolution: How Native Ads Have Changed the Game

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The Advertising Revolution: How Native Ads Have Changed the Game

The Advertising Revolution

Sponsored by: Market One Media Group

Many decades ago, the world was much simpler for advertisers.

Buying a ½ page newspaper ad or a 30-second television spot reached thousands of people, and consumers weren’t oversaturated with ads.

Today, we are bombarded with over 5,000 brand exposures each day. Of those, 362 are advertisements with only 12 of them “making an impression” on us.

Here’s a breakdown of average exposure per day:

  • Average number of advertisement and brand exposures per day per person: 5,000+
  • Average number of “ads only” exposures per day: 362
  • Average number of “ads only” noted per day: 153
  • Average number of “ads only” that we have some awareness of per day: 86
  • Average number of “ads only” that made an impression (engagement): 12

With this oversaturation of the traditional ad market, the concept of “native ads” has emerged.

Native Ads

Native advertising is paid content that is created to fit the same format as a publisher’s organic content. In other words, it shows up to regular viewers as “sponsored” or “paid” posts in the same streams as regular content.

Native ad spending has exploded, and from 2013 to 2018, the industry is expected to quadruple in size.

There are compelling statistics for both the audience and advertisers on native ads:

Audience:

  • 70% of individuals want to learn about products or content through content rather than traditional advertising.
  • 32% of consumers said, when given a choice, that they would rather share a native ad with friends and family vs 19% for banner ads.
  • 57% of publishers have a dedicated editorial team to create content readers will care about, leaving publishers in full control, not brands, which ultimately benefits readers.

Advertisers:

  • People view native ads 53% more than banner ads.
  • Native advertising generates up to an 82% increase in brand lift.
  • Native ads that include rich media boost conversion rates by up to 60%.
  • Purchase intent is 53% higher with native ads (vs. 34%)
  • 49x higher clickthrough rate, 54% lower cost-per-click

New Media

Native ads are also being used by many of the “new media” and adtech companies that have had very successful fundraising rounds:

Vice
Latest raise: $250 million (2014)
Led by: A+E Networks
Valuation: $2.5 billion

AppNexus
Latest raise: $62.7 million (2015)
Valuation: $1.2 billion

Vox
Latest raise: $200 million (2015)
Led by: NBC Universal
Valuation: $850 million

Buzzfeed
Latest raise: $200 million (2015)
Led by: NBC Universal
Valuation: $1.5 billion

The Future of Native Advertising?

Right now 41% of brands use native advertising as part of their marketing mix, but the shift is only beginning. Here’s what experts think the future of native holds:

Tessa Gould, Director of Native Ads Products, The Huffington Post

“Next for native is being able to use other ad technologies to make native smarter. At the moment everyone is creating content and talking about social actions. But how do you go about retargeting the people who view the native ad elsewhere with banner ads and actually converting them into customers?”

Audra Martin, VP of Advertising, The Economist Group

“As publishers start to educate brands more and agencies more, the content will just get better. Then distribution, in terms of getting more sophisticated, not in terms of fooling readers but making it relevant to readers in the right place at the right time.”

Steve Edwards, Digital Sales Director, Hearst UK
“My main thing is about control. Native will continue to develop along the lines it has. Increasingly it’s about publishers taking control of the message and advertisers and brands coming along with us. Getting distribution right and getting measurement metrics right, how we actually measure success. How we can create work that is as good as the editorial that surrounds it. Take the logo off it, does it still work? That’s really interesting for us, and we’ve still got a way to get there.”

Sebastian Tomich, VP of Advertising, The New York Times
“Brands are jumping into native because they feel like they should be.”

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This Giant List of 100+ Marketing Stats Reveals What Actually Works

This massive infographic uses 100+ marketing stats to highlight the tactics that are working in modern-day digital universe.

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In just the last decade, the marketing world has been dramatically transformed.

Spending on digital media surpassed television ads in 2017, and now global digital spend is anticipated to top $333 billion this year.

As a result, today’s entrepreneurs and small businesses are starting to think about marketing in almost exclusively digital terms – and to have a successful online strategy, it’s important to see the data on what tactics are actually working.

Visualizing 100+ Marketing Stats

Today’s infographic comes to us from Serpwatch and it highlights seven of the most important digital marketing trends to keep an eye on this year.

Along the way, it highlights over 100 useful marketing stats that help to reveal the strategies and tactics that maximize ROI in the online arena.

This Giant List of 100+ Marketing Stats Reveals What Actually Works

It’s well known that digital media tactics – such as using social media, SEO, search, email, and content marketing – all offer unprecedented levels of analytics, customization, and segmentation for the modern marketer.

However, with so much to think about when using these techniques online and at scale, they can also be quite overwhelming.

Luckily, the above list provides some marketing stats that stand out in potentially helping businesses make the most out of their digital campaigns.

Stats That Stand Out

Here are some of the marketing stats from the above list that we thought stood out the most, for each category:

  • Search:
    The top five search results for a keyword on Google get 70% of the clicks.
  • Social media:
    80% of B2B leads come in through LinkedIn vs. 13% on Twitter and 7% on Facebook.
  • Video marketing:
    Video will represent 82% of all internet traffic by 2021.
  • Cold email marketing:
    Emails sent between 10-11am have the highest open rates. Tuesday is the best day to send cold emails.
  • Paid advertising:
    The mobile ad blocking rate has increased 90% year-over-year.
  • Lead generation:
    61% of marketers say generating traffic and leads is their top challenge.
  • Content marketing:
    47% of buyers viewed 3-5 pieces of content before engaging with a sales rep.

Although the digital marketing space is vast, the useful statistics above may help create some clarity for marketers trying to get the most out of their efforts in 2019 and beyond.

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How the Tech Giants Make Their Billions

Collectively, the Big Five tech giants combine for revenues of $802 billion, which is bigger than Saudi Arabia’s economy. Here’s how it breaks down.

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How the Tech Giants Make Their Billions

At a glance, it may seem like the world’s biggest technology companies have a lot in common.

For starters, all five of the Big Tech companies (Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, and Alphabet) have emerged as some of the most valuable publicly-traded companies in the world, with founders such as Jeff Bezos or Bill Gates sitting atop the global billionaire list.

These tech giants also have a consumer-facing aspect to their business that is front and center. With billions of people using their platforms globally, these companies leverage user data to tighten their grip even more on market share. At the same time, this data is a double-edged sword, as these same companies often find themselves in the crosshairs for mishandling personal information.

Finally, all of these companies have a similar origin story: they were founded or incubated on the fertile digital grounds of the West Coast. The company that has the weakest claim to such origins would be Facebook, but even it has been based in Silicon Valley since June 2004.

Sizing Up the Tech Giants

For all of their commonalities, it seems that there is less of a mold for how these tech giants end up generating cashflow.

But before we get to how Big Tech makes its money, let’s start by looking at the financials at a higher level. The following data comes from the 2018 10-K reports filed last year.

CompanyRevenue (2018)Net Income (2018)Margin
Combined$801.5 billion$139.0 billion17.3%
Apple$265.6 billion$59.5 billion22.4%
Amazon$232.9 billion$10.1 billion4.3%
Alphabet$136.8 billion$30.7 billion22.4%
Microsoft$110.4 billion$16.6 billion15.0%
Facebook$55.8 billion$22.1 billion39.6%

Together, the Big Five tech giants combined for just over $800 billion of revenue in 2018, which would be among the world’s 20 largest countries in terms of GDP. More precisely, they would just edge out Saudi Arabia ($684 billion GDP) in terms of size.

Meanwhile, they generated a total of $139 billion of net income for their shareholders, good for a 17.3% profit margin.

How Big Tech Makes Money

Let’s dig deeper, and see the differences in how these companies generate their revenue.

You are the Customer

In the broadest sense, three of the tech giants make money in the same way: you pay them money, and they give you a product or service.

Apple (Revenue in 2018: $265.6 billion)

  • Apple generates a staggering 62.8% of its revenue from the iPhone
  • The iPad and Mac are good for 7.1% and 9.6% of revenues, respectively
  • All other products and services – including Apple TV, Apple Watch, Beats products, Apple Pay, AppleCare, etc. – combine to just 20.6% of revenues

Amazon (Revenue in 2018: $232.9 billion)

  • Amazon gets the most from its online stores (52.8%) as well as third-party seller services (18.4%)
  • Amazon’s fastest-growing segment is offline sales in physical stores
  • Offline sales generate $17.2 billion in current revenue, growing 197% year-over-year
  • Amazon Web Services (AWS) is well-known for being Amazon’s most profitable segment, and it counts for 11.0% of revenue
  • Amazon’s “Other” segment is also rising fast – it mainly includes ad sales

Microsoft (Revenue in 2018: $110.4 billion)

  • Microsoft has the most diversified revenue of any of the tech giants
  • This is part of the reason it currently has the largest market capitalization ($901 billion) of the Big Five
  • Microsoft has eight different segments that generate ~5% or more of revenue
  • The biggest three are “Office products and cloud services” (25.7%), “Server products and cloud services” (23.7%), and Windows (17.7%)

The remaining tech giants charge you nothing as a consumer, so how are they worth so much?

You are the Product

Both Alphabet and Facebook also generate billions of dollars of revenue, but they make this money from advertising. Their platforms allow advertisers to target you at scale with incredible precision, which is why they dominate the online ad industry.

Here’s how their revenues break down:

Alphabet (Revenue in 2018: $136.8 billion)

  • Despite having a wider umbrella name, ad revenue (via Google, YouTube, Google Maps, Google Ads, etc.) still drives 85% of revenue for the company
  • Other Google products and services, like Google Play or the Google Pixel phone, help to generate 14.5% of total revenue
  • Other Bets count to 0.4% of revenue – these are Alphabet’s moonshot attempts to find the “next Google” for its shareholders

Facebook (Revenue in 2018: $55.8 billion)

  • Facebook generates almost all revenue (98.5%) from ads
  • Meanwhile, 1.5% comes from payments and other fees
  • Despite Facebook being a free service for users, the company generated more revenue per user than Netflix, which charges for its service
  • In 2018 Q4, for example, Facebook made $35 per user. Netflix made $30.

So while the tech giants may have many similarities, how they generate their billions can vary considerably.

Some are marketing products to you, while others are marketing you as the product.

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