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34 Startup Metrics for Tech Entrepreneurs

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34 Startup Metrics for Tech Entrepreneurs

Courtesy of: Funders and Founders

34 Startup Metrics That Tech Entrepreneurs Need to Know

Today’s infographic comes from Funders and Founders and information designer Anna Vital, and it lists the important metrics to gauge traction and success of new startups.

Several years ago, a key challenge with launching a new tech startup venture was that there weren’t many precedents to follow.

  • How do you scale a company?
  • How do you measure growth and costs in a more meaningful way?
  • Does the company have real traction?

Of course, there were knowledgeable people in the tech ecosystem that knew these things – for example, venture capitalists and ex-founders that had been successful with previous ventures – but they were tough to gain access to, and many of their theories and best practices weren’t yet widespread.

Fast forward to today, and the practices around new startups are much more established. While this can be a blessing and a curse to new founders, at least a more standardized set of metrics helps to give founders a sense of where their company stands.

Key Startup Metrics, According to VCs

The infographic from Funders and Founders lists 34 startup metrics for founders to know – but which one should be a focus for new ventures?

Here’s what three bigtime VCs have said about the startup metrics that they consider to be most important at early stages:

“Month-over-Month Organic Growth”

For most companies, MoM organic growth is a very useful metric and depending on the base, 20–50% MoM growth can be good. Retention, referral, and churn are all things we look at, too.

– Aileen Lee, Cowboy Ventures

According to Aileen Lee, who originally came up with the “unicorn” term, organic growth is a particularly useful metric.

On the other hand, Bill Gurley of Benchmark says that monitoring conversions is a comprehensive metric that is a good proxy for several key business areas.

“Conversion Rate”

No other metric so holistically captures as many critical aspects of a web site – user design, usability, performance, convenience, ad effectiveness, net promoter score, customer satisfaction – all in a single measurement.

– Bill Gurley, Benchmark

Paul Graham, of Y Combinator fame, says that the metric depends on the stage. If you have revenue, then revenue growth is the metric you want. If you’re not there yet, user growth is a good proxy.

“Revenue Growth or Active Users”

The best thing to measure the growth rate of is revenue. The next best, for startups that aren’t charging initially, is active users. That’s a reasonable proxy for revenue growth because whenever the startup does start trying to make money, their revenues will probably be a constant multiple of active users.

– Paul Graham, VC and co-founder of Y Combinator

It should also be noted that the most relevant metric to you depends on your business model. For example, MRR (Monthly recurring revenue) and churn rates would be particularly important to SaaS (Software-as-a-service) startups, while MAUs (Monthly active users) and organic traffic may be more important measurements for online media companies.

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What Would $5,000 Invested in Nvidia Be Worth Today?

Small fortunes have been made for those investing in Nvidia stock. But how much would have they earned if they bought before it skyrocketed?

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What Would $5,000 Invested in Nvidia Be Worth Today?

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Investing in Nvidia has been highly lucrative, especially for investors who got in early.

As America’s largest chipmaker, its stock price has soared given its critical role in powering AI. Last year alone, its share price jumped 272%, vaulting it into becoming one of the world’s most valuable companies.

This graphic shows how much a $5,000 investment in Nvidia would have grown over time, based on data from Yahoo Finance.

Investing in Nvidia Before the AI Boom

Below, we show how much an investment in Nvidia would have increased in value over the last several decades:

Year Invested (January 1st)Stock PriceStarting ValueValue Today (as of Feb 15, 2024)
2000$0.77$5,000$4,718,052
2010$3.85$5,000$943,610
2015$4.80$5,000$756,854
2020$59.11$5,000$61,460
2023$195.37$5,000$18,595

For those who bought in 2000, a $5,000 investment would be worth over $4.7 million today, with Nvidia’s stock price rising 94,261% over the time period.

At the time, Nvidia had just invented its graphics processing unit (GPU), which allowed computer graphics to render more seamlessly in video games and video editing. These high-performance units complete complex computing tasks, and Nvidia was creating leading technology at the time.

Over the last decade, Nvidia has increasingly focused on AI technology, with key developments launching as early as 2012. Yet it was not until 2020 when its share price really began to soar as the company’s end customer segments increasingly became data centers and cloud computing, alongside video games.

In fact, since 2020 alone, its share price has soared 1,129%—making a $5,000 investment worth twelve times as much today.

So far this year, its stock price shows no sign of stopping, driven by its outsized role in the AI chipmaking market. Roughly 70% of all chips are sold by Nvidia, outpacing key competitor AMD by a landslide.

The company’s Q4 revenues topped $22 billion, setting another historical record, amounting to a 265% year-over-year increase in revenues. In 2023, Nvidia sold 2.5 million chips with customers including OpenAI, Microsoft, Meta Platforms, and Alphabet. The price range for these chips can span anywhere from $16,000 to $100,000.

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