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31 Quotes on How to Launch a Startup

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Startup culture has captured our collective imaginations, and today there are more people dabbling in entrepreneurship than ever before.

The fast pace, the pivots, and the setbacks involved in a new venture all make for an exciting day-to-day where anything can happen. And at the end of the road, with a little luck and some hard work, there is even potential to make a significant return on investment: a take-out offer, or an IPO can be a life changing event for one’s career and financial security.

But the startup life is also grueling and unforgiving. To achieve success, an entrepreneur needs have an incredible amount of perseverance and resolve – the fact is that there is no shortage of obstacles that can threaten to instantly bankrupt or disempower any new venture.

How to Launch a Startup, in Quotes

Today’s infographic from Wrike serves as a guide to help those aspiring entrepreneurs that aim to go down this challenging but potentially rewarding path.

See all 31 quotes on how to launch a startup, from notable founders and financiers, in the infographic below:

31 Quotes on How to Launch a Startup

The experts make clear that to launch a startup requires deep thought and action in the following areas:

Courage and Confidence
Taking a chance can be scary, but don’t be afraid to take the leap of faith on a good idea.

Solve a Problem
Don’t start a company just to be an entrepreneur – but instead solve a real problem. If your product helps to improve other people’s lives, you will always have a market.

Build Your Product
Anyone can come up with an idea to launch a startup, but when it comes to building a product it is all about the execution. The aptitude for translating a mere concept to a physical reality is paramount. Put more succinctly, as Michael Dell says: “Ideas are a commodity. Execution of them is not.”

The Customer is Right
Henry Ford and Steve Jobs have shown us that the average customer cannot always envision the future, whether it is the automobile or the iPhone. However, once you have a product solidified, testing it with customers will give you a wealth of feedback that could change the entire course of product development. Be responsive to this feedback.

Iterate
Make sure everything that can be measured is properly tracked. Update your approach based on this data until it’s clear that the product is a winner.

The Merits of Bootstrapping
Bootstrapping is often underrated. Smart bootstrapping allows you to address big problems without the distractions or opinions of investors.

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Visualizing the Stages of Startup Funding

About 1,500 companies are founded daily, but how does the typical startup get financed? This creative graphic uses pie to explain startup funding rounds.

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startup funding

About 1,500 new companies are founded every day.

However, only a fraction of these entrepreneurial pursuits will eventually operate on a grand scale. With many of these companies propelled by venture capital funding, how do investors provide the cash—and get a piece of the startup pie?

Pie in the Sky

Today’s creative infographic from Fundera uses pie to visualize each stage of startup funding, from pre-seed funding to initial public offering.

It’s worth noting that numbers presented here are hypothetical in nature, and that startups can have all kinds of paths to success (or failure).

Visualizing the Stages of Startup Funding

Pre-Seed Funding

In the pre-seed funding round, the founder(s) pitch their business idea to potential investors. These are typically friends, family, angel investors, or pre-seed venture capital firms.

Since there is likely no performance data or positive financials to show yet, potential investors must focus on two primary features: the strength of the idea and the team.

The biggest factor in our decision-making is always the founding team […] that’s what success lives or dies on in this industry: the ability for founders to make really quick, good decisions.

First Round Capital

At this stage, both the level of risk and potential payoff are at their highest.

Seed Funding

After the initial stages, seed funding—the first official funding round for many companies—takes place. Entrepreneurs use the funds for market testing, product development, and bringing operations up to speed.

By this point, investors are generally looking for the company’s ability to solve a need for customers in a way that will achieve product-market fit. At this stage, ideally there is also some level of traction or consumer adoption, such as user or revenue growth. The level of risk is still quite high here, so investors tend to be angel investors or venture capitalists.

Series Funding

In each series funding, the startup generally raises more money and increases their valuation. Here’s what investors tend to expect in each round:

  • Series A: Companies that not only have a great idea, but a strategy for creating long-term profit.
  • Series B: Companies generating consistent revenue that must scale to meet growing demand.
  • Series C (and beyond): Companies with strong financial performance that are looking to expand to new markets, develop new products, buy out businesses, or prepare for an Initial Public Offering (IPO).

Private equity firms and investment bankers are attracted to series C funding as it tends to be much less risky. In recent years, startups have been staying private longer. For example, Uber obtained Series G funding and debt financing before going public.

Initial Public Offering

Once a company is large and stable enough, it may choose to go public. An investment bank will commit to selling a certain amount of shares for a certain amount of money.

If the IPO goes well, investors will profit and the company’s reputation gets a boost—but if it doesn’t, investors lose money and the company’s reputation takes a hit.

Here’s how the example investment amounts break down at each stage:

 Pre-SeedSeedSeries ASeries BSeries CIPO
Amount Invested< $1M<$1.7M<$10.5M<$24.9M<$50M<$10.5M
Average Equity Stake10-15%10-25%15-50%15-30%15-30%15-50%

An investor’s equity is diluted as other investors come on board, but their “piece of the pie” usually becomes more valuable.

The Venture Capital Funnel

How likely is it that a startup makes its way through the entire process? In a study of over 1,110 U.S. seed tech companies, only 30% exited through an IPO, merger, or acquisition (M&A).

Companies that reach a private valuation of $1B or more, known as unicorns, are even more rare at just 1%.

At each stage, natural selection takes hold with fewer companies advancing. Here’s a look at the entire funnel, with the “second round” generally corresponding to a series A stage, a “third round” generally corresponding to a series B stage, and so on.

venture capital funnel

Source: CB Insights

Notably, 67% of the companies stalled out at some point in the funding process, becoming either dead or self-sustaining. While startups carry a high degree of risk, they also present opportunities for substantial rewards.

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Entrepreneurship

Craft Beer Boom: The Numbers Behind the Industry’s Explosive Growth

This infographic takes a closer look at the craft beer revolution sweeping across the U.S,. and its far reaching economic impact.

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All movements start with rebellion, and the craft beer revolution is no different.

Born from the frustration of mass-produced beer made from cheap ingredients, entrepreneurs went head-to-head with global brewery giants to showcase local and independent craftsmanship.

Suddenly, drinking beer became less about the alcoholic content and more about the quality and experience. Craft beer allowed for constantly changing flavors, recipes, and stories. With sales accounting for 24% of U.S. beer market worth over $114 billion, the global craft beer movement has been historic.

Which States Bring Home the Beer?

Today’s map from C+R research demonstrates the growth of the craft beer market, by ranking the U.S. states based on craft breweries per capita.
The Rise of Craft Beer in the U.S.

The data for this visualization comes from The Brewers Association—an American trade group of over 7,200 craft brewers, suppliers, and distributors, as well as the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.

According to the data, Vermont has emerged as the craft beer capital of the U.S. with 11.5 breweries per 100,000 people. That’s equal to 151 pints of beer produced per drinking-age adult. Following closely behind are Montana and Maine, each with 9.6 breweries per capita.

You’ll notice that in Southern states such as Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, that there are only 0-0.9 breweries per capita. This is actually because of tighter liquor laws—for example, only 10 years ago, it was illegal to sell specialty beer in South Carolina that contained more alcohol content than a typical Budweiser.

Becoming a Brewery Nation

In 2008, there were only 1,574 breweries across the United States.

However, as you can see in the below data from the Brewers Association, the total amount of craft breweries, microbreweries, and brewpubs has climbed to 7,346 in just a decade.

 20142015201620172018Change ('17-'18)
Total U.S.3,8694,6725,6066,5967,45012.9%
Regional Craft13517818620223013.9%
Microbreweries2,0762,6263,2513,9334,52215%
Brewpubs1,6031,8242,1022,3552,59410.1%
Total Craft3,8144,6285,5396,4907,34613.2%
Large/Non-craft4644671061041.9%

Of the three categories of craft beer, microbreweries have contributed the most to recent production growth. Last year, they accounted for 80% of this growth, up from 60% in 2017.

The term microbrewery refers to the maximum amount of beer the brewery can produce. For microbreweries, that number is 15,000 barrels (460,000 U.S. gallons) of beer per year. They also have to sell 25% or more of their beer on site, which is why we are witnessing a surge in breweries that double up as a restaurant or bar.

Comparing this data to figures on larger breweries available from the Breweries Association, it is clear that it is the larger, more established breweries that are feeling the heat. While their growth slows, more small breweries open, and sales are further cannibalized.

The Economic Impact of the Craft Beer Market

When it comes to pure dollars, C+R Research notes that Colorado comes in at #1 with an economic impact of $764 per person. Vermont is at the #2 spot with an economic impact of $667 per person, despite having a higher concentration of breweries per capita.

How do the rest of the states compare?
Economic Impact
The global craft beer market is expected to reach $502.9 billion by 2025—while the craft brewing industry contributed $76.2 billion to the U.S. economy in 2017, including more than 500,000 jobs.

Will Craft Remain a Growth Category?

While many argue that craft beer is approaching its peak, the data is promising. Experimentation with new processes and ingredients will continue to drive the market forward.

Craft brewers all over the world are tapping into the novelty factor by exploring weird and wonderful innovations, like deer antler-infused beer and take-home brewing kits.

While the overall beer market lagged in sales by 0.8% last year, the craft brew category grew by 3.9% using the same measure. Further, craft still only makes up 13.2% in total beer volume in the U.S., meaning there is still plenty of market share to gain.

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