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A Decade Later: What $1K Invested in These Stocks is Worth Today

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On October 11, 2007, the Dow Jones Industrial Average hit a new high of 14,198.10 in intraday trading.

At the time, it would have been impossible to know, but such a peak wouldn’t again be matched until 2013, almost six years later. Investors were in for a roller coaster, and a slow and unpredictable recovery – how would their portfolios fare?

Investing at the Market Peak

Hypothetically, let’s say that you bought $1,000 of shares in some of America’s best-known companies, right during these pre-crisis highs in October 2007.

Today’s chart from HowMuch.net shows how you would have fared based on share price alone, not including the re-investment of dividends. Each blue dot below shows the $1,000 investment, and each pink circle represents the value of that investment today.

A Decade Later: What $1,000 Invested in These Companies is Worth Today

If you’d had invested in Netflix around the time company launched its streaming service in the United States, you would have brought in 50X your initial investment.

Meanwhile, Amazon shares jumped over 10X in value, and even “boring” blue chip companies like FedEx or McDonald’s at least doubled in value. The only company worth less (on the above list) is GE, though it’s worth noting that they would have also paid a dividend over this timeframe.

Common Wisdom?

Historically speaking, over long-term windows, the stock market has almost always increased in value. But for people that bought in October 2007, it would have felt like the world was ending and that a recovery was nearly impossible.

While it can certainly be argued that asset prices were inflated through QE, record-low interest rates, and other controversial central bank tactics from the crisis onwards, in hindsight it is also clear that a portfolio formed at the 2007 peak would have turned out alright today.

DJIA

Of course, I think we all would agree that it would have been a lot nicer to invest at rock-bottom prices in 2009. However, it’s nice to know that holding stocks through the crisis ultimately paid off for those that had the patience to do so.

As the current market gets more and more expensive, this may be something worth keeping in mind.

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Investor Education

The Top 5 Reasons Clients Fire a Financial Advisor

Firing an advisor is often driven by more than cost and performance factors. Here are the top reasons clients ‘break up’ with their advisors.

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The following content is sponsored by Morningstar
This circle graphic shows the top reasons for firing a financial advisor.

The Top 5 Reasons Clients Fire a Financial Advisor

What drives investors to fire a financial advisor?

From saving for a down payment to planning for retirement, clients turn to advisors to guide them through life’s complex financial decisions. However, many of the key reasons for firing a financial advisor stem from emotional factors, and go beyond purely financial motivations.

We partnered with Morningstar to show the top reasons clients fire an advisor to provide insight on what’s driving investor behavior.

What Drives Firing Decisions?

Here are the top reasons clients terminated their advisor, based on a survey of 184 respondents:

Reason for Firing% of Respondents
Citing This Reason
Type of Motivation
Quality of financial advice
and services
32%Emotion-based reason
Quality of relationship21%Emotion-based reason
Cost of services17%Financial-based reason
Return performance11%Financial-based reason
Comfort handling financial
issues on their own
10%Emotion-based reason

Numbers may not total 100 due to rounding. Respondents could select more than one answer.

While firing an advisor is rare, many of the primary drivers behind firing decisions are also emotionally driven.

Often, advisors were fired due to the quality of the relationship. In many cases, this was due to an advisor not dedicating enough time to fully grasp their personal financial goals. Additionally, wealthier, and more financially literate clients are more likely to fire their advisors—highlighting the importance of understanding the client. 

Key Takeaways

Given these driving factors, here are five ways that advisors can build a lasting relationship through recognizing their clients’ emotional needs:

  • Understand your clients’ deeper goals
  • Reach out proactively
  • Act as a financial coach
  • Keep clients updated
  • Conduct goal-setting exercises on a regular basis

By communicating their value and setting expectations early, advisors can help prevent setbacks in their practice by adeptly recognizing the emotional motivators of their clients.

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Curious about what drives investors to hire a financial advisor? Discover the top 5 reasons here.

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