oldest-business-state

The Oldest Business in Each State

The Oldest Business in Each State

Oldest Business in Each State

Is the oldest business in your state a mom-and-pop shop, or a famous megabrand?

Today’s infographic from Busy Beaver Button Co. maps the diverse range of companies that claim to be the oldest in their respective states. While many of them exist today as modest family-owned businesses such as pizzerias or taverns, some have also grown into respected brands known around the country, like Jim Beam or Imperial Sugar.

The Most Interesting Standouts

Here are the standouts from the list, including a pirate-themed restaurant and a global aerospace company.

Georgia: The Pirates’ House (est. 1753)
Located in downtown Savannah, The Pirates’ House is thought to be the oldest standing building in the state of Georgia. It was once an inn and tavern for seaman visiting from abroad, developing quite a negative reputation among the locals for scoundrelry and drunkenness. Today, the restaurant is obviously more family-friendly – and it is one of Savannah’s most-popular tourist attractions.

California: Ducommun (est. 1849)
Ducommun is an aerospace and defense manufacturer based founded in Carson, California with a current $320 million market capitalization on the NYSE. The company manufactures structural and electronic components for commercial, military, and space aircraft, including the Boeing 737 NG and 777 airliners.

Kentucky: Jim Beam (est. 1795)
Amazingly, seven generations of the Beam family have been involved in whiskey production for the company since it was founded in 1795. After Prohibition impacted the business, the company was rebuilt by James B. Beam, and the whiskey still bears his name today.

Texas: Imperial Sugar (est. 1843)
Located in the aptly-named Sugar Land, Texas, this company is a sugar behemoth with revenues of nearly $1 billion per year. Imperial Sugar focuses on producing sugar products and sweeteners that are made from non-GMO cane sugar.

Vermont: Fort Ticonderoga Ferry (est. 1799)
The oldest business in Vermont is not a multi-national brand – but instead, a quaint seven-minute ferry ride that provides scenic daytime crossings on Lake Champlain between Ticonderoga, New York and Shoreham, Vermont.

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