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Canadian Oil and Gas: The US Needs Less. Asia Needs More.

The fastest growing markets for energy exports now lie in non-OECD nations.  However, Canada cannot respond to this opportunity as it lacks the infrastructure to get energy to tidewater and overseas.  This lack of market access costs Canada as much as $50m per day.

Canadian Oil and Gas Infographic

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4 Responses to “Canadian Oil and Gas: The US Needs Less. Asia Needs More.”

  1. Peter Salonius says:

    47 MINUTE VIDEO – DAVID EVANS WILL SHOW YOU WHY YOU SHOULD INVESTIGATE THE BASIS FOR THE CLIMATE HYPOTHESIS THAT IS DISTORTING THE CANADIAN (AND WORLD) ECONOMY

    Visual capitalist.com subscribes to the idea that carbon containing greenhouse gas EMISSIONS are of some real importance.

    Visualcapitalist.com has not done its homework concerning climate science, and thus visualcapitalist.com contributes to the continuing survival of government orchestrated concepts that erroneously link CURRENT emissions of carbon containing greenhouse gas EMISSIONS to climate change.

    This is one of several powerful 50:1 YOU TUBE video interview / expositions on climate science, climate theory and climate politics, see:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xI3doCKhI7Q

    I suggest that it will be difficult for anyone to remained convinced that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) hypothesis concerning ‘catastrophic human caused climate change’ is correct after listening to David Evans’ epiphany with regard to climate science and his reasons for negating the conventional hypothesis that is supposedly supported by ’97%’ of the world’s scientists — and — why they support it.

    However if you still hold to the conventional ‘catastrophic human caused climate change hypothesis’ in spite of mounting evidence against it, then you should understand that your conviction is based on a decades long popularization program, by the IPCC, climate models, and lazy governments in support of this simplistic hypothesis that has been financed by your tax dollars.

    Peter Salonius

  2. David Love says:

    David Evans utilizes defining characteristics of scientific denialism to make his claims, in particular the use of the logical fallacies – the ‘strawman argument’ and ‘cherry-picking’.

    By ignoring the bulk of the scientific evidence Evans comes to erroneous conclusions about ocean warming and sea level rise,

    as detailed on this website:
    http://www.skepticalscience.com/David-Evans-All-at-Sea-about-Ocean-Warming-and-Sea-Level-Rise.html

  3. keith says:

    This is how I summed up Canada`s situation ;
    You can con some of the people sometimes but the smart ones know the real truth e.g. Canada has numerous issues right now :-
    1) too many properties for sale no buyers.
    2) too much bitumen and no pipes to get it to our customers other than the USA.
    3) USA will block the XL pipeline then we are in the #$%$.
    4) loads of foreign overseas workers taking jobs on lower hourly rates, which means less money floating around the economy.
    But hey everything is fine everything is rosy I think not !

  4. Joe Mayhew says:

    VC usually does great work. This is deficient.

    I would recommend some focus on 3 major shortfalls and a re-issue of this note.

    1.
    Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis would consider impact on carbon stocks; for coal / tar sands soil carbon release and loss of sequestration potential are the most relevant… emissions to air are a trivial detail by comparison.

    2.
    Energy Returned on Energy Invested. Unconventional hydrocarbons simply don’t contribute much surplus energy to society. Export policies degrade energy surplus even further. See the 2010 analysis by Tullet Prebon titled ‘Dangerous Exponentials’. Moving paper money around is no substitute for surplus energy.

    3.
    Adjacent issues are biodiversity, water use and human quality of life; there’s a reason wages are sky-high to work at the tar sands. Just the journey to and from work can be dangerous… so far as I can tell the long-term impacts on local communities from unconventional hydrocarbons are polluted air, soil and water and the only way paper money gets into the communities is if the sisters and daughters go to work in the new strip clubs.

    Joe

    M +44 7811 368276

  5. […] You hear a lot about Canada being a petrostate from energy industry opponents. You might hear them say things like, “we’ve fallen into the staples trap.” You’ll also hear much the same story, although with a different implication, from the industry’s proponents who are quick to argue that our economy depends heavily on oil and gas, and without oil and gas we’d be short schools, hospitals, and other social programs (PDF). […]

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  1. Canada, the failed petrostate? - Blog Central, Econowatch - Macleans.ca

    […] You hear a lot about Canada being a petrostate from energy industry opponents. You might hear them say things like, “we’ve fallen into the staples trap.” You’ll also hear much the same story, although with a different implication, from the industry’s proponents who are quick to argue that our economy depends heavily on oil and gas, and without oil and gas we’d be short schools, hospitals, and other social programs (PDF). […]

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